Cloud computing companies in the U.S. could lose more than $10 billion by 2020 as a result of the Trump administration’s reputation regarding data privacy, according to Swiss hosting company Artmotion.
A whitepaper published by Artmotion suggests that growth rate in U.S. cloud revenue relative to the rest of the world will decline significantly more than previously forecast by IDC.
See also: Tech Goes From White House to Doghouse in Trump’s Washington
IDC’s Worldwide Public Cloud Services Spending Guide predicts that the U.S. will account for 60 percent of cloud revenue worldwide to 2020. The same research, however, suggests revenue growth in the U.S. will be lower than that in all seven other regions analyzed by IDC, and according to Artmotion does not take into account the sharply falling confidence businesses have in the capacity of U.S. companies to protect the privacy of data in the cloud.
“While these figures may be concerning for U.S. service providers already, they don’t take full account of the scale of the disapproval of President Trump’s actions since taking office,” according to Mateo Meier, CEO of Artmotion.
Artmotion’s own research shows that half of U.S. and U.K. citizens feel online data privacy is less secure under President Trump. Further, 24 percent are most concerned about their own government, while only 20 percent consider the Russian government most concerning, and 15 percent fear the Chinese government. Both Russia and

 

Brought to you by ITPro
There’s a new release of OpenStack, the open source infrastructure-as-a-service platform for cloud computing. The new release, Pike, isn’t chock-full of new features, as OpenStack’s focus for the next several releases will be on stability, scalability, performance and ease-of-use.
Actually, this is a good time for the platform’s developers to step away from any mad rush to add new features and concentrate on improving the basics. Back in April, when we reported on Open Stack’s ninth User Survey, we noted that although use of the platform was on the rise, in some cases user satisfaction was declining, most likely over usability issues.
The most notable improvement to Pike, according to at least one media pundit, is that the new OpenStack is easier to deploy and update. If true — I haven’t been brave enough to try installing OpenStack yet — this will be welcome news throughout the data centers where the platform is deployed. Simply put, it has a reputation of being a bear to deploy and just as difficult to update.
OpenStack is becoming easier for IT organizations to incorporate into their plans in other ways as well.
“With new delivery models like private-cloud-as-a-service, it’s easier than ever to adopt OpenStack through the open source ecosystem where users are not locked into a proprietary technology or single vendor,” the OpenStack Foundation said in a statement.

 

Brought to you by Talkin’ Cloud
SolarWinds MSP announced Tuesday that it has acquired SpamExperts, an Amsterdam-based mail security solutions provider. The terms of the deal have not been disclosed.
Founded in 2005, SpamExperts offers SaaS-based mail protection and mail archiving services for IT service providers, including web hosts, MSPs, ISPs and telcos. In a statement, SolarWinds MSP says that SpamExperts will augment its SolarWinds MSP Mail offering, promising to provide more details in the next 30 days.
See also: SpamExperts Releases Open Source Anti-Spam Framework OrangeAssassin
In an email to partners, posted to the Web Hosting Talk forum, SpamExperts said that the acquisition will bring no immediate changes, only more opportunities.

We have some exciting news to share with you.
SpamExperts has been acquired by SolarWinds® MSP the leading global provider of comprehensive, scalable IT service management solutions.
As you know, SpamExperts has provided SaaS-based mail protection and mail archiving services for best-in-class MSPs, ISPs, telcos, and other IT service providers globally for more than ten years. SolarWinds MSP empowers more than 20,000 IT service providers worldwide with technologies to fuel their success. Solutions that integrate layered security, collective intelligence, and smart automation—both on-premises and in the cloud, backed by actionable data insights, help IT service providers get the job done easier and faster. SolarWinds MSP

 

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Hewlett Packard Enterprise is joining forces with VMware to offer composable infrastructure based on HPE Synergy and VMware Cloud Foundation. The integration is called, simply enough, VMware Cloud Foundation on HPE Synergy, and HPE is touting it as the industry’s first composable platform using VMware’s software-defined data center (SDDC) platform. The companies made the announcement at VMworld in Las Vegas on Tuesday.
This is all about the hybrid cloud of course, which providers have come to see as the brass ring for attracting enterprise clients. The solution promises to simplify transformations to a hybrid infrastructure by enabling single-click deployment of traditional and private cloud workloads and allows infrastructure to be dynamically reallocated in minutes.
“In today’s competitive digital world, enterprises need technology that enables them to quickly introduce and scale new services,” Ric Lewis, senior VP and general manager of HPE’s Software-Defined and Cloud Group, said in a statement. “HPE Synergy with VMware Cloud Foundation will deliver a private cloud experience that empowers IT to be an internal service provider and enables rapid response to business needs with single-click DevOps delivery.”
Although the announcement is short on details about how the integration will work in practice, on the surface at least, this would seem to be a natural pairing.
HPE Synergy is an all-in-one hardware

 

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Data centers these days are busy replacing expensive hardware solutions with “software-defined” everything, but the trend is the opposite when it comes to security. While software still prevails in keeping servers secure, hardware is often being added to the mix as another layer of protection, especially during the boot process, when a computer is vulnerable to dangers such as maliciously modified firmware.
This trend started when UEFI — and Secure Boot — replaced BIOS on computers, and was carried a step further when Google began including an additional custom designed hardware security chip on all servers and peripherals in its data centers. In June, Hewlett Packard Enterprise followed suit and announced it was joining the secured-by-hardware crowd by including its own custom chip on its Gen10 servers. Lenovo also includes a degree of security-on-a-chip technology on its line of servers, through XClarity Controller.
There are several advantages to having security protections contained in chipsets that are separate from a server’s CPUs. Being isolated from the server’s main components, they are more difficult for an outside hacker who manages to get through a system’s defenses to find and penetrate. In addition, they can utilize read-only memory that can be difficult or impossible to modify.
See also: Here’s How Google Secures Its Cloud
At its Cloud Next event in March, Google unveiled a custom security chip

 

DreamHost is considering its next move after a judge last week ordered the Los Angeles-based web hosting company to comply with a government warrant seeking information about subscribers to the anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
DreamHost’s general counsel Chris Ghazarian said that while overall he sees the decision as a win, the company would have preferred even more content being removed from the warrant or the warrant being invalidated all together.
“Now our team and I are considering our next steps which are essentially whether or not we are going to appeal, and we’ll make that decision very soon,” Ghazarian said in an interview with The WHIR.
Chief Judge Robert Morin ruled on Thursday that DreamHost had to turn over subscriber data, but under a much narrower scope than first anticipated. Morin told the District of Columbia Superior Court that in an order to “balance the First Amendment protections and the government’s need for this information” he would oversee which data prosecutors’ intend to seize and use of the data to ensure it is limited to individuals connected to the riots.
Ghazarian said that the Department of Justice (DoJ) pulled back quite a bit in what they initially asked for, including removing the request for IP addresses.
“The entire process overall has been a win because I don’t think anybody really expected the government number one to back down from their original warrant, especially since we tried to have a professional

 

DreamHost is considering its next move after a judge last week ordered the Los Angeles-based web hosting company to comply with a government warrant seeking information about subscribers to the anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
DreamHost’s general counsel Chris Ghazarian said that while overall he sees the decision as a win, the company would have preferred even more content being removed from the warrant or the warrant being invalidated all together.
“Now our team and I are considering our next steps which are essentially whether or not we are going to appeal, and we’ll make that decision very soon,” Ghazarian said in an interview with The WHIR.
Chief Judge Robert Morin ruled on Thursday that DreamHost had to turn over subscriber data, but under a much narrower scope than first anticipated. Morin told the District of Columbia Superior Court that in an order to “balance the First Amendment protections and the government’s need for this information” he would oversee which data prosecutors’ intend to seize and use of the data to ensure it is limited to individuals connected to the riots.
Ghazarian said that the Department of Justice (DoJ) pulled back quite a bit in what they initially asked for, including removing the request for IP addresses.
“The entire process overall has been a win because I don’t think anybody really expected the government number one to back down from their original warrant, especially since we tried to have a professional

 

Web hosting provider Codero has named John Martis president and CEO, the company announced today.
Martis will take over from current co-CEOs Leo Staurulakis and Bill King effective September 5, while Staurulakis and King will continue to sit on the company’s board of directors, with Staurulakis remaining as board chairman.
Martis’ track record includes founding ISP American Digital Network, which he built into a multi-million dollar company. He also draws on hosting industry experience from his time with Hostway, which transitioned from a shared hosting focus to dedicated servers and managed hosting under his leadership, and Abacus America (Aplus.Net), for which he oversaw data center operations, system engineering and software development as executive vice president. In 2013, when current Hostway president and CEO Emil Sayegh was CEO of Codero, Martis was president and CEO of Hostway.
“Codero provides sophisticated products at scale so that all companies, regardless of size, can leverage advanced IT solutions at their own pace,” Bill King, current Codero co-CEO and a member of Codero’s board of directors, said. “John’s proven track record of engaging customers and leveraging strategic partnerships will be instrumental in Codero’s continued growth.”
“Codero has the rare combination of passionate customers, leading products and remarkable employees,” Martis said. “Codero’s dedication to market innovation and providing best-in-class

 

Fusion has reached an agreement to acquire Birch‘s Cloud and Business Services Business in an all-stock transaction, according to an announcement Monday.
Fusion will take over Birch’s cloud customers, operations, and infrastructure, and enhance Fusion’s strategy as a “single source for cloud,” the company said. The “single source” strategy consists of fully-integrated cloud solutions, delivered over a single platform, which Fusion said mitigates cloud migration challenges, provides more control over end-to-end user experience and eliminates “finger pointing” among service providers.
The combination is expected to result in cost savings bringing pro forma annual adjusted EBITDA to $150 million, significantly boosting Fusion’s free cash flow and reducing its leverage ratio to 4x debt to EBITDA.
“This acquisition is a major milestone in Fusion’s targeted and disruptive strategy of becoming the leading single-source cloud services provider to business and enterprise customers,” Matthew Rosen, Fusion’s Chief Executive Officer said. “Customers increasingly demand an end-to-end experience that is reliable as well as efficient and innovative. Fusion is well positioned to provide these services having been first-to-market to pursue this strategy, and can now do so with increased scale and resources.”
When complete, the acquisition will give Fusion a total of over 150,000 business customers, more than 800

 

Brought to you by MSPmentor
It’s being called a 500-year storm and Houston, Texas-based Elevated Technologies finds itself smack in the middle of it.
As early as the middle of last week, the managed services provider (MSP) began reaching out to clients, preparing the organizations as much as humanly possible for the fury of Hurricane Harvey.
Four Providers’ Houston Data Centers Online, but Access Roads Flooded
But despite the best-laid plans, the extent of damage to the state’s Gulf Coast still came as a shock.
“No one really anticipated this,” Jason Rorie, founder of Elevated Technologies, told MSPmentor today.
“I don’t think anyone really anticipated the kind of flooding that Houston would be subject to,” he added. “The city is basically underwater.”

Task number one for the MSPs five-member team was ensuring customers’ data would survive.

“We started talking really on Wednesday when they projected where it would hit,” Rorie said. “First thing we did is make sure that all of our clients, all of their offsite backups were running successfully. We use Veeam and StorageCraft.”
As the storm neared landfall on Friday afternoon, the MSP began instructing clients to shut down on-premises servers before those employees left for the day.
“The flooding causes power outages and once your UPS (uninterruptible power supply) batteries drain and your servers crash, that’s when problems really start,” Rorie said.
The hope is that once the storm

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