Brought to you by MSPmentor
In small print, it’s nearly impossible to discern that the “e” in the sender’s google.com domain is not the Latin “e” used to write English, but rather the nearly identical-looking Cyrillic “e” used in Russian and other Slavic languages.
As a result, the fake security alert about the recipient’s linked Google account looks legitimate enough to inspire a click – even by someone reasonably well trained in avoiding phishing scams.
The notion that training alone is increasingly not enough to protect organizations is at the core of Inky Phish Fence, an Office 365 add-in or Chrome extension for G Suite that uses machine learning technology to instantly analyze emails for subtle discrepancies and other signs that could signal phishing.
“Training is predicated on the idea that the human user is going to catch stuff,” said David Baggett, founder and CEO of Inky, maker of Inky Phish Fence. “Instead of a human, you have to have a computer to catch it; you have to have a progam do it.
“Inky is the first program that we know of that does that.”
Often the first step of lucrative malware attacks, phishing is quickly becoming a very intricate affair.
“We’re seeing phishing attacks that are really resistant to training,” he said.
He pointed to cases of phishing attacks even less “sophisticated” than the Cyrillic “e” example above.
In the small print of an email graphic, cybercriminals artfully substitute “cl” for

 

Brought to you by MSPmentor
In small print, it’s nearly impossible to discern that the “e” in the sender’s google.com domain is not the Latin “e” used to write English, but rather the nearly identical-looking Cyrillic “e” used in Russian and other Slavic languages.
As a result, the fake security alert about the recipient’s linked Google account looks legitimate enough to inspire a click – even by someone reasonably well trained in avoiding phishing scams.
The notion that training alone is increasingly not enough to protect organizations is at the core of Inky Phish Fence, an Office 365 add-in or Chrome extension for G Suite that uses machine learning technology to instantly analyze emails for subtle discrepancies and other signs that could signal phishing.
“Training is predicated on the idea that the human user is going to catch stuff,” said David Baggett, founder and CEO of Inky, maker of Inky Phish Fence. “Instead of a human, you have to have a computer to catch it; you have to have a progam do it.
“Inky is the first program that we know of that does that.”
Often the first step of lucrative malware attacks, phishing is quickly becoming a very intricate affair.
“We’re seeing phishing attacks that are really resistant to training,” he said.
He pointed to cases of phishing attacks even less “sophisticated” than the Cyrillic “e” example above.
In the small print of an email graphic, cybercriminals artfully substitute “cl” for

 

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
As the data center expansion frenzy by the largest cloud providers in top markets becomes less of a frenzy and more of an incremental growth story, Equinix is positioning itself to capture the next wave of cloud data center growth, which, according to its executives, will be driven by the next generation of applications and opportunities in new markets around the world.
For the world’s largest data center provider that means making some changes to the way it develops business strategy and the way it structures deals with some of its clients.

“We’ve lived with six years or seven years of a wave — we call it kind of the first wave in cloud — and we think there’s another wave coming,” Stephen Smith, Equinix CEO, said on a call with analysts Wednesday. “Obviously, the big hyper-scalers and the cloud providers have learned from their first wave of deployments,” so the next wave “is going to be different.”
To make sure its strategy is in tune with those changes, the company has created a new business group led by one of its top executives. The new Strategy, Services, and Innovation unit consists of the office of the CTO, business development, product management, and product engineering, as well as several new business teams, all charged with “evaluating and translating key market, competitive, and technology trends into actionable business requirements.”
Charles Meyers, who’d been Equinix’s COO for the past

 

(Bloomberg) — Indonesia and  Alphabet Inc.’s Google agreed to step up monitoring of content on YouTube after the government said it was concerned about the growing misuse of social media platforms to spread material related to terrorism, racial violence and pornography.
The world’s fourth-most populous country has begun the trial of a so-called “trusted flagger system” to filter content on the video sharing website and will seek to formalize it in the coming months,  Rudiantara, Communications and Information Technology minister, told reporters in Jakarta on Friday. The flagging system, to be used by the ministry and local non-government groups, will be limited to YouTube and will not apply to Google’s search engine, he said.
U.K.’s Rudd Continues Campaign Against Terrorism Content Online
“We want to ensure content doesn’t promote violence or incites divisions in the country,” Rudiantara, who like many Indonesian uses only one name, said after a meeting with Google executives. Taj Meadows, Google’s head of policy communications for Asia Pacific, declined to comment.
Indonesian officials and executives from Twitter Inc. agreed at a separate meeting on Friday on the need to improve monitoring of content although they didn’t decide on a method. Samuel Abrijani, director general for information applications at Communications Ministry, said the government has proposed a similar system for Twitter as the one agreed with Google.
Terrorism,

 

Brought to you by IT Pro
While we may have a short-term memory when it comes to security breaches, it will be a long-time before anyone forgets WannaCry and the mayhem it created as it infected more than 300,000 PCs around the world back in May.
On Tuesday night the hackers behind the WannaCry attack started to collect on the payments made by their victims, emptying bitcoin wallets tied to the WannaCry ransomware, according to a report by Quartz.
In total, the hackers collected $140,000 in bitcoin from three bitcoin wallets, which are essentially accounts where bitcoins can be stored or transferred to and from. The hackers used seven different withdrawals to collect the full amounts from the bitcoin wallets, Quartz said. The website had set up a Twitter bot to monitor withdrawals from the accounts, which are publicly accessible on the blockchain.
“The money was likely sent through a bitcoin mixer, a process that obscures its trail from bitcoin to hard currency. The process is a sort of laundering operation for digital currency,” Quartz said.
Separately, the FBI arrested 23-year-old British security researcher Marcus Hutchins on Thursday. Hutchins is credited with stopping the WannaCry outbreak, but a report by The Guardian said his arrest is related to his alleged involvement in creating the banking trojan Kronos between 2014 and 2015.
An indictment filed in the Eastern District of Wisconsin said Hutchins, who is also known by his screenname Malwaretech, and

 

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Red Hat’s announcement this week that it has “acquired the assets and technology” of Permabit Technology should eventually have a mixed bag of effects on data center operators of different types.
Permabit, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based company, provides software for data deduplication, compression, and thin provisioning. Although the wording of Red Hat’s announcement makes it unclear whether it’s bought the company outright or just some portion of it, we know that 16 Permabit employees will be making a move to Red Hat. Also not disclosed was how much money changed hands in this transaction.
It’s easy to see why Red Hat would be interested in Permabit’s technology. Red Hat is a leader in the hybrid computing field, in which companies maintain on-premises data centers running private clouds while also incorporating public cloud services. This means that a majority of its customers are in charge of their own storage, making Permabit’s proprietary deduplication and compression technology’s ability to reduce storage capacity requirements a big plus. Big Red also gains data reduction software released last year, designed specifically for use with Linux.
Red Hat also has had an extensive close look at the technology it’s purchased. Last year, when developing its Linux products, Permabit announced it was collaborating with Red Hat to test and certify its VDO data reduction for Linux with Red Hat Ceph Storage and

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