Brought to you by Talkin’ Cloud
IBM is suing a former senior manager for violating a non-compete agreement as he starts a new job at Amazon Web Services (AWS) three months after leaving his role as CIO for transformation and operations at IBM.
According to a report by Westfair Online, IBM sued Jeff S. Smith last week in White Plains, NY, demanding that he repay $1.7 million in stock bonuses. Smith had worked at IBM since 2014.
IBM argues that in starting his job at AWS on Monday, he would “inevitably be involved in decision-making about how best to compete against IBM and would inevitably disclose or use IBM trade secrets.” The lawsuit also alleges that Smith had shared inside information with AWS CEO Andy Jassy while he was working for IBM, wiping his company phone and tablet to make it impossible to detect communications, the report said.
The judge, who blocked Smith from starting his job at AWS on Aug. 1 until a full hearing could be scheduled, amended the order to allow him to begin work Monday in “listen and learn mode” for training purposes.
According to IBM, Smith signed a non-compete agreement where he agreed not to work for a competitor for one year. He notified IBM in June of his plans to start work at AWS in August.
IBM has asked the court to ban Smith from work for AWS until May 2, 2018. There is a hearing scheduled for Aug. 21.
In June, AWS won a temporary restraining order to prevent a former executive from joining Smartsheet, a collaboration

 

Brought to you by IT Pro
Six weeks after a group of tech executives traveled to Washington, D.C. for a June meeting with President Donald Trump and his advisers, including Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and his team are starting to work with companies, including Apple and Google, to get government to more effectively use technology.
According to a report by Recode, Kushner and other top advisers had a private call last week with major tech companies who are members of the American Technology Council, asking for input to modernize government IT. One of the ideas on the table is a system where “leading tech engineers do ‘tours of duty’ advising the U.S. government on some of its digital challenges,” Recode says.
Though details are scarce at this point, that idea is not a new one. The U.S. Digital Service has run a similar program where it recruits “top technologists for term-limited tours of duty with the Federal Government.”
See also: Executives Are More Worried About Amazon Than Trump’s Setbacks
The American Technology Council, which was formed in May, is led by Kushner’s White House Office of American Innovation (WHOAI), a small team focused on bringing “new thinking and real change” to the country’s toughest problems, according to a report by Politico.
So far consensus around the effectiveness of WHOAI is mixed, with critics worried that Kushner’s split focus will mean critical projects – like moving more agencies to the cloud

 

Brought to you by IT Pro
Six weeks after a group of tech executives traveled to Washington, D.C. for a June meeting with President Donald Trump and his advisers, including Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and his team are starting to work with companies, including Apple and Google, to get government to more effectively use technology.
According to a report by Recode, Kushner and other top advisers had a private call last week with major tech companies who are members of the American Technology Council, asking for input to modernize government IT. One of the ideas on the table is a system where “leading tech engineers do ‘tours of duty’ advising the U.S. government on some of its digital challenges,” Recode says.
Though details are scarce at this point, that idea is not a new one. The U.S. Digital Service has run a similar program where it recruits “top technologists for term-limited tours of duty with the Federal Government.”
See also: Executives Are More Worried About Amazon Than Trump’s Setbacks
The American Technology Council, which was formed in May, is led by Kushner’s White House Office of American Innovation (WHOAI), a small team focused on bringing “new thinking and real change” to the country’s toughest problems, according to a report by Politico.
So far consensus around the effectiveness of WHOAI is mixed, with critics worried that Kushner’s split focus will mean critical projects – like moving more agencies to the cloud

 

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Today IBM announced the availability of the beta version of its Distributed Deep Learning software it says has demonstrated “a leap forward in deep learning performance.”
Deep learning is a form of AI that relies on the application of “artificial neural networks” inspired by the biological neural networks of human and animal brains. Its focus is on giving computers the ability to “understand” the contents of digital images, videos, audio recordings and the like in much the same way that people do.
Much of the potential for deep learning remains unfulfilled, however, because the logistics of processing the great amount of data required for a system’s ”deep level training” makes it a slow process that can take days or even weeks. Accuracy of the results is another issue contributing to the time factor, as the system needs to be taught multiple times in order to gain the desired results. A higher accuracy on each pass means fewer times the computer must be “retrained” until it gets it right.
Reducing the time factor has been difficult because merely adding more compute power with faster processors and more of them doesn’t speed things up. Actually, just the opposite: as the number of “learner” processors increases, the computation time decreases as expected, but the amount of communication time per learner stays constant.
In other words, bottlenecks get in the way.
“Successful distributed deep learning

 

Do you want to work in a data center? Or are you currently studying for a Cisco CCNA or CCNP certification? If so, you should know that Cisco is updating the material that its data center exams cover. Owing to…

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