(Bloomberg) — Shopify Inc. continued its winning streak, beating analysts’ revenue estimates for the tenth quarter in a row and boosting its forecast for the year. But the company was still under the shadow of a report by a renowned shortseller that questioned its sustainability.
The Canadian e-commerce platform had $171.5 million in sales in the quarter ending Sept. 30, topping the average analyst projection of $166.5 million. Shopify also reported adjusted earnings per share of 5 cents, beating estimates for a loss of 2 cents and achieving operating profitability earlier than the company had forecast.
The third-quarter earnings report Tuesday came after an attack by short-selling firm Citron Research that called the company a “get-rich-quick” scheme and said Shopify’s growth is an illusion because so many of its users leave the platform each month. At some point, the company will run out of new users to sign-up and growth will end abruptly, Citron founder Andrew Left argued. Shopify Chief Executive Officer Tobi Lutke has called Left a “troll” and Wall Street analysts have so far almost unanimously stood with the company, but Shopify still hasn’t released new numbers to shore up its argument that growth is sustainable.
Shopify, based in Ottawa, has been the best performing stock on Canada’s benchmark equity index this year, gaining 155 percent. The shares were volatile in early trading, initially dropping almost 5 percent before

 

AWS is targeting developers of artificial intelligence (AI) applications with new EC2 instances powered by NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs.
The new P3 instances deliver 14x performance improvement over P2 instances for machine learning applications, AWS said Wednesday.
The instances are designed for uses including intensive machine learning, deep learning, computational fluid dynamics, computational finance, seismic analysis, molecular modelling, and genomic workloads, according to a blog post by AWS Chief Evangelist Jeff Barr.
The Tesla V100 GPUs are based on NVIDIA’s next-generation Volta architecture, and each have 5,120 CUDA cores and 640 Tensor cores, with speeds up to 125 TFLOPS mixed-precision floating point operations per second. Tensor cores are designed for fast training and inference of large-scale neural networks, and the GPUs will shorten the time necessary to train machine learning models from days to hours, according to the announcement.
The launch means AWS is the first provider to bring Volta-powered instances to market, giving it a potentially significant edge for developers of cutting-edge AI applications. At NVIDIA’s annual conference in May, CEO Jensen Huang said in a keynote address that a “flood” of AI workloads is coming to data centers.
“Comparisons between the P3 and today’s scale-out supercomputers are harder to make, given that you can think of the P3 as a step-and-repeat component of a supercomputer that you can launch on as as-needed

 

(Bloomberg) — The internet is steadily pulling in more shoppers, advertisers and businesses, helping the largest technology companies including Amazon.com Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc. churn out strong revenue and profit growth for another quarter.
All three beat analysts’ sales and profit estimates in the September quarter, sending their shares higher in late trading Thursday and putting the stocks on course to hit records or come close Friday. Consumers and corporations are moving more of their day-to-day functions and business to the internet, from advertising and shopping to workplace software, data storage and applications hosting. That means increased sales for Amazon’s online marketplace, more eyeballs on ads dished out in Google’s mobile search results, and busier servers in all three companies’ data centers.
Even technology companies on the periphery of this internet boom managed to catch some of the wave. Intel Corp.’s server-chip business has struggled as big companies use their own data centers less and move operations to the cloud. However, the semiconductor company is now selling more to the big internet companies that lead in those services.
There are risks: regulators around the world are considering how to control internet companies’ influence, and in the U.S., Google and Facebook Inc. are facing criticism after their advertising services were misused by Russia-linked groups to influence last year’s presidential election. But

 

(Bloomberg) — Any day now, Google is expected to achieve quantum supremacy—the use of a quantum computer to solve a problem that even the most advanced supercomputer can’t unravel. That milestone, which Google has said it will reach by year-end, will no doubt be greeted with headlines proclaiming the dawn of the quantum computing age. Prepare for lots of stories about how quantum computing will soon do everything from inventing wonderful new pharmaceuticals and almost-magical new materials (good) to rendering obsolete all existing public-key encryption (not so good).
There’s plenty of momentum. Earlier this month, Intel Corp. researchers unveiled a superconducting chip for quantum computers. The news follows several other advances in quantum computing over the past two years—from tech big boys like International Business Machines Corp., and Google, which is owned by Alphabet Inc., as well as Canada’s D-Wave Systems Inc., the only company to sell a commercial quantum computer (it has sold four) and startups like Rigetti. Google itself just released software to make it easier for chemists and material scientists to use the quantum machines it and others have built.
Investors are getting excited. In June, Blue Yard Capital, a venture capital firm based in Berlin, held a conference on quantum computing in Munich that drew many other investors and large enterprises hoping to cash in on the new technology. Several other VCs I’ve spoken

 

(Bloomberg) — Russian cybersecurity giant Kaspersky Lab said it uploaded secret data linked to the National Security Agency from a personal computer in the U.S., though it said staff destroyed the material and didn’t show it to anyone outside the company.
The code was in a zip file containing malware samples that Kaspersky’s antivirus software removed from the home computer, the company said in a statement, confirming earlier reports about its involvement in the leak of classified material. The program automatically uploaded the file to Kaspersky’s specialists for further analysis, it said.
Russian hackers exploited vulnerabilities in the antivirus program to breach an NSA contractor’s computer in 2015 and steal classified files that he’d taken home, according to a person familiar with the matter. Israeli officials informed their U.S. counterparts about the operation after they hacked into Kaspersky’s network, the New York Times reported on Oct. 11.
The incident happened in 2014, a year earlier than reported, and Russian hackers weren’t involved, according to Kaspersky, whose products have been banned from U.S. government agencies since September amid concerns over the company’s alleged links to Russian intelligence. Kaspersky denies it has any connection to government spy agencies.
Malware Code
Moscow-based Kaspersky said staff who examined the computer file found it contained Equation malware code, a sophisticated hacking tool kit linked to the NSA.

 

A large botnet of IoT devices is growing more rapidly than Mirai did in 2016, according to researchers. The botnet has reportedly infected nearly two million devices in the past month.
The botnet, called “IoT_reaper” by 360 Netlab and “IoTroop” by Check Point researchers, was first detected in September when the security firms noticed a pattern of attempts to exploit IoT device vulnerabilities. They tracked the growth of the botnet for over a month before sounding the public alarm with blog posts.
“While some technical aspects lead us to suspect a possible connection to the Mirai botnet, this is an entirely new campaign rapidly spreading throughout the globe,” Check Point said in a blog post. “It is too early to assess the intentions of the threat actors behind it, but it is vital to have the proper preparations and defense mechanisms in place before an attack strikes.”
The bot utilizes some code borrowed from Mirai, but attacks nine known vulnerabilities, rather than cracking weak passwords, according to Netlab. Whoever is behind the code has been changing it, making it more dangerous, the researchers say, even though it is in an early expansion stage, and its purpose is unknown. The number of exploits found in samples is increasing, with one recently added within two days of disclosure of the vulnerability.
Check Point calls it “the next cyber hurricane,” and says devices manufactured by GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, Netgear, Linksys and others have been

 

A large botnet of IoT devices is growing more rapidly than Mirai did in 2016, according to researchers. The botnet has reportedly infected nearly two million devices in the past month.
The botnet, called “IoT_reaper” by 360 Netlab and “IoTroop” by Check Point researchers, was first detected in September when the security firms noticed a pattern of attempts to exploit IoT device vulnerabilities. They tracked the growth of the botnet for over a month before sounding the public alarm with blog posts.
“While some technical aspects lead us to suspect a possible connection to the Mirai botnet, this is an entirely new campaign rapidly spreading throughout the globe,” Check Point said in a blog post. “It is too early to assess the intentions of the threat actors behind it, but it is vital to have the proper preparations and defense mechanisms in place before an attack strikes.”
The bot utilizes some code borrowed from Mirai, but attacks nine known vulnerabilities, rather than cracking weak passwords, according to Netlab. Whoever is behind the code has been changing it, making it more dangerous, the researchers say, even though it is in an early expansion stage, and its purpose is unknown. The number of exploits found in samples is increasing, with one recently added within two days of disclosure of the vulnerability.
Check Point calls it “the next cyber hurricane,” and says devices manufactured by GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, Netgear, Linksys and others have been

 

(Bloomberg) — The U.S. Justice Department is moving to scale back the use of orders forcing technology companies to turn over customer data without alerting users to the clandestine interception of their information.
Microsoft Corp., which sued the government over the practice last year, and other internet giants have argued that the future of cloud computing is in jeopardy if customers can’t trust that their data will remain private. In response to new guidelines quietly issued last week by the Justice Department aimed at making “sneak-and-peek” searches more selective, Microsoft said Monday it plans to drop its lawsuit, which was backed by rivals including Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Amazon.com Inc.
The rapid growth of the cloud, in which customer data is stored by providers like Microsoft, Apple Inc., Amazon and Google in the technology companies’ own servers, has increased the frequency of warrants seeking information.
Going forward, prosecutors must “conduct an individualized and meaningful assessment” of whether a secrecy order is needed, according to a memo issued by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. For internet users whose data is sought, the government shouldn’t delay notifying them for more than a year, except “barring exceptional circumstances,” according to the memo. Microsoft argued in court that too many data requests carry secrecy provisions, often of indefinite duration, that violate the company’s free-speech

 

HostDime has purchased a land parcel in Bogotá, Colombia where it intends to build a Tier IV data center to meet the booming demand of the local market, the company announced in a blog post on Friday.
The land is located in an enclosed industrial park which HostDime calls “highly secure” in North Bogotá, and the company plans to build the facility over the next year or two, according to the post.
The company has operated in Columbia since 2008, and already has a data center and a sales and support office in Bogotá.
The new 3,500 square-foot data center will be one of only a few Tier IV facilities in Columbia, with redundant power and cooling to support 99.9 percent availability, and extensive physical access control measures, including CCTV and biometric systems.
From the data center, HostDime will offer high density cloud infrastructure for colocation clients, with redundant connections from C&W, Level3 and Globnet, as well as its managed dedicated servers, and KVM VPS, which the company says is one of its most popular products in the Colombian market.
HostDime launched a Tier III data center in Brazil earlier this year, as it continues to expand in the Latin American market, which had projected IT revenue growth of 20 percent in 2016, according to Frost & Sullivan.

 

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Hewlett Packard Enterprise is getting out of the business of supplying bulk orders of stripped-down commodity servers to cloud giants like Amazon, Microsoft, and Alibaba.
After seeing their server sales drop when cloud companies started ordering their custom computers directly from manufacturers in Asia, HPE (then HP) and Dell both introduced product lines for commodity gear to better compete in that space.
Related: Guide to Facebook’s Open Source Data Center Hardware
But competition has been tough. In March, HPE chief executive Meg Whitman said publicly that the company was feeling pain from “significantly lower demand” for servers just from one tier-1 service provider. Anonymous sources told Bloomberg that provider was Microsoft.
Speaking at an analyst event last week in San Francisco, Whitman said the company would no longer compete in the low-cost hardware business, focusing instead on higher-margin gear, such as high-end servers, hyper-converged infrastructure, storage, and networkingequipment, some of which it would continue selling to tier-1 cloud players, Fortunereported.
Related: Meet Microsoft, the New Face of Open Source Data Center Hardware
But all hyper-scale cloud operators have substantial hardware design operations of their own, and there’s no guarantee they won’t turn to the same Asian OEMs for the higher-end gear too. Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon, and Google have been designing their own network switches,

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