(Bloomberg) -Docker Inc. helped establish a type of software tool known as containers. Thanks to the startup, containers have become an essential part of many companies’ app development process, and they’ve made the company rich. Venture capitalists have poured about $240 million into the startup, according to research firm CB Insights.
Then along came Google, with its own free container system called Kubernetes. Google has successfully inserted Kubernetes into the coder toolbox. While Docker and Kubernetes serve slightly different purposes, customers who choose Google’s tool can avoid paying Docker. The startup gives away its most popular product while trying to convince developers to pay for extras, notably a program that does the same thing as Google’s.
“Kubernetes basically has ruled the industry, and it is the de facto standard,” said Gary Chen, an analyst at IDC. “Docker has to figure out how do they differentiate themselves.”
It’s up to Steve Singh to escape a situation that’s trapped many startups battling cash-rich tech giants like Google, dangling free alternatives. Singh was appointed chief executive officer of Docker in May. His focus is on convincing customers to buy a collection of software to set up and manage their containers. And he needs to persuade them that his startup can offer things Alphabet Inc.’s Google can’t. ”Google’s business around Kubernetes is around Google Cloud,” Singh said. “There’s a

 

(Bloomberg) -Docker Inc. helped establish a type of software tool known as containers. Thanks to the startup, containers have become an essential part of many companies’ app development process, and they’ve made the company rich. Venture capitalists have poured about $240 million into the startup, according to research firm CB Insights.
Then along came Google, with its own free container system called Kubernetes. Google has successfully inserted Kubernetes into the coder toolbox. While Docker and Kubernetes serve slightly different purposes, customers who choose Google’s tool can avoid paying Docker. The startup gives away its most popular product while trying to convince developers to pay for extras, notably a program that does the same thing as Google’s.
“Kubernetes basically has ruled the industry, and it is the de facto standard,” said Gary Chen, an analyst at IDC. “Docker has to figure out how do they differentiate themselves.”
It’s up to Steve Singh to escape a situation that’s trapped many startups battling cash-rich tech giants like Google, dangling free alternatives. Singh was appointed chief executive officer of Docker in May. His focus is on convincing customers to buy a collection of software to set up and manage their containers. And he needs to persuade them that his startup can offer things Alphabet Inc.’s Google can’t. ”Google’s business around Kubernetes is around Google Cloud,” Singh said. “There’s a

 

(Bloomberg) — In the race to commercialize a new type of powerful computer, Microsoft Corp. has just pulled up to the starting line with a slick-looking set of wheels. There’s just one problem: it doesn’t have an engine – at least not yet. The Redmond, Washington-based tech giant is competing with Alphabet Inc.’s Google, International Business Machines Corp. and a clutch of small, specialized companies to develop quantum computers – machines that, in theory, will be many times more powerful than existing computers by bending the laws of physics.

Microsoft says it has a different approach that will make its technology less error-prone and more suitable for commercial use. If it works. On Monday, the company unveiled a new programming language called Q# – pronounced Q Sharp – and tools that help coders craft software for quantum computers. Microsoft is also releasing simulators that will let programmers test that software on a traditional desktop computer or through its Azure cloud-computing service.
The machines are one of the advanced technologies, along with artificial intelligence and augmented reality, that Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella considers crucial to the future of his company. Microsoft, like IBM and Google, will most likely rent computing time on these quantum machines through the internet as a service.D-Wave Systems Inc. in 2011 became the first company to sell a quantum computer, although its technology has been

 

(Bloomberg) — Big technology companies have added the digital signatures of 40,000 terrorist videos and images to a shared database as they seek to keep extremist content off their platforms.
Facebook Inc., Google’s YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet Inc., Microsoft Corp., and Twitter Inc. revealed the numbers in a joint blog post Monday.
The four big social media companies, which are part of a group called the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, announced one year ago that they would begin sharing digital fingerprints – known as hashes – of videos they removed from their platforms for terrorism.
Under the initiative, if a company removes a piece of content from its network for violating policies around terrorism, it is logged in the shared database. Then, if someone tries to post the same content to one of the other participating social networks, the content is automatically flagged for review – usually by a human analyst – and possible removal.
Technology companies have been under increasing pressure from Western politicians to do more to tackle terrorist propaganda and recruitment online. British Prime Minister Theresa May has been particularly active in accusing tech companies of not doing enough to keep extremists off their platforms and has called for international regulation to force the companies to do more or face substantial penalties.
The companies, for their part, have recently been highlighting their progress in using artificial

 

(Bloomberg) — Big technology companies have added the digital signatures of 40,000 terrorist videos and images to a shared database as they seek to keep extremist content off their platforms.
Facebook Inc., Google’s YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet Inc., Microsoft Corp., and Twitter Inc. revealed the numbers in a joint blog post Monday.
The four big social media companies, which are part of a group called the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, announced one year ago that they would begin sharing digital fingerprints – known as hashes – of videos they removed from their platforms for terrorism.
Under the initiative, if a company removes a piece of content from its network for violating policies around terrorism, it is logged in the shared database. Then, if someone tries to post the same content to one of the other participating social networks, the content is automatically flagged for review – usually by a human analyst – and possible removal.
Technology companies have been under increasing pressure from Western politicians to do more to tackle terrorist propaganda and recruitment online. British Prime Minister Theresa May has been particularly active in accusing tech companies of not doing enough to keep extremists off their platforms and has called for international regulation to force the companies to do more or face substantial penalties.
The companies, for their part, have recently been highlighting their progress in using artificial

 

(Bloomberg) — Amazon.com Inc. unveiled new cloud computing services and tools Wednesday aimed at maintaining its edge over Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc. in the fast-growing, profitable market.

Amazon Web Services Chief Executive Officer Andy Jassy announced machine learning capabilities such as speech recognition and translation, intended to make the technology more accessible to developers who don’t have the time or resources to experiment with it on their own.
The presentation showed that Amazon anticipates high demand for machine learning products that can be sold to a variety of industries. Speech and image recognition and real-time language translation were among the tools Jassy unveiled Wednesday at the company’s annual convention in Las Vegas. The gathering is expected to draw 40,000 people for a week of learning about the latest offerings and services.
Amazon introduced SageMaker, which provides popular algorithms for tasks such as parsing data or recognizing images and speech. Amazon also showed off AWS DeepLens, a $249 device to help developers understand and experiment with machine learning. In a demonstration, the camera recognized a smile to be a positive reaction to a music album cover and a frown to be a negative reaction, enabling it to fine tune a customized playlist for the user. Other possible uses are to program a garage door to open when the camera recognizes a license plate number or sending an alert to an owner when their dog jumps on

 

(Bloomberg) — Amazon.com Inc. unveiled new cloud computing services and tools Wednesday aimed at maintaining its edge over Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc. in the fast-growing, profitable market.

Amazon Web Services Chief Executive Officer Andy Jassy announced machine learning capabilities such as speech recognition and translation, intended to make the technology more accessible to developers who don’t have the time or resources to experiment with it on their own.
The presentation showed that Amazon anticipates high demand for machine learning products that can be sold to a variety of industries. Speech and image recognition and real-time language translation were among the tools Jassy unveiled Wednesday at the company’s annual convention in Las Vegas. The gathering is expected to draw 40,000 people for a week of learning about the latest offerings and services.
Amazon introduced SageMaker, which provides popular algorithms for tasks such as parsing data or recognizing images and speech. Amazon also showed off AWS DeepLens, a $249 device to help developers understand and experiment with machine learning. In a demonstration, the camera recognized a smile to be a positive reaction to a music album cover and a frown to be a negative reaction, enabling it to fine tune a customized playlist for the user. Other possible uses are to program a garage door to open when the camera recognizes a license plate number or sending an alert to an owner when their dog jumps on

 

(Bloomberg) — Verizon Communications Inc. paid $4.5 billion for Yahoo! Inc.’s web businesses. Then it took a $500 million hit for post-acquisition costs. It’s poised to pay up again, thanks to a high-profile deal struck by Marissa Mayer when she ran the internet company.

Executives at the telecom giant are negotiating a bill they will likely owe Mozilla Corp., owner of the Firefox browser, after an expensive web search deal fell apart. Verizon could end up paying hundreds of millions of dollars, depending on how the agreement is interpreted, according to people familiar with the deal and online chat logs shared with Bloomberg. The bill could also come in lower, the people said.
Last week, Mozilla said its latest Firefox browser will rely on Google’s search engine as the default in the U.S. and three other countries. That broke a five-year contract Mozilla signed with Yahoo in 2014.
For search engines, like Yahoo and Alphabet Inc.’s Google, default placement in a browser provides a reliable pipeline of queries and ad revenue. Yahoo agreed to pay Mozilla about $375 million a year for five years for those rights in 2014. That contract had a clause, agreed to by Mayer, that let Mozilla walk away and still get paid if Yahoo was acquired and Mozilla could show the change of control damaged its brand and search experience, according to a person familiar with the situation. Verizon bought Yahoo earlier this year, bringing this part of the agreement into play.
After

 

(Bloomberg) — International Business Machines Corp. is increasing the pressure on Alphabet Inc.’s Google in the battle to commercialize quantum computing technology.
Quantum computers hold the promise of being able to solve difficult problems from fields such as chemistry and material science that are currently beyond the reach of the most powerful conventional supercomputers. They may also one day render some current encryption techniques obsolete.
See also: Google’s ‘Quantum Supremacy’ Moment May Not Mean What You Think
IBM said Friday it has created a prototype 50 qubit quantum computer. A machine this size is believed to be close to the threshold at which it could perform tasks beyond the reach of conventional supercomputers – a major milestone in computer science that researchers in the field refer to as “quantum supremacy.”
See also: IBM Makes Breakthrough in Race to Commercialize Quantum Computers
In a statement, IBM said it “aims to demonstrate capabilities beyond today’s classical systems” with quantum systems this size.
Friday’s announcement puts IBM in a neck-and-neck race with Google, which has said that it plans to show a similarly-sized machine capable of achieving this milestone by the end of the year.
Today’s quantum computers remain too small and too error-prone to outperform conventional supercomputers at most tasks, but the technology is advancing rapidly. A number of companies - including IBM, Google, Microsoft

 

(Bloomberg) — Microsoft Corp., Oracle Corp. and IBM — looking to stoke demand for cloud computing services — are said to be shifting incentives for their sales representatives, pushing them to ensure customers become active users over the long haul.
Microsoft in July revamped the way it pays its sales staff to tie incentives to how much customers actually use cloud-based software — rather than how many sign a contract for cloud services, according to sales chief Judson Althoff. Oracle has been rolling out new rewards for at least some employees that also are connected to customers’ use of its cloud services, according to people familiar with the matter.
International Business Machines Corp. in the past year has restructured its cloud sales team and tied compensation more closely to usage, according to other people with knowledge of the matter. Traditionally, companies would ink large software deals based on factors such as the number of a customer’s devices — and not actual subsequent use of the products.
The cloud business is a crucial growth area for the traditional enterprise technology pioneers, battling against rivals Amazon.com Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google. The public cloud services global market is likely to increase more than 18 percent to $260.2 billion this year and almost double to $411 billion in 2020, according to Gartner Inc. Microsoft, for example, said last week it had generated $20.4 billion in commercial cloud revenue

© 2012 Webhosting news Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha