New Apple App Store guidelines state that apps created from “commercialized template or app generation services” will be rejected from inclusion in the App Store as of Jan. 1, 2018.
According to a report by TechCrunch, template and DIY services, as well as platforms and developers serving the SMB and non-profit markets, will be impacted by the new guidelines. The guidelines, which seem to be broader than many developers realized, were released by Apple after its Worldwide Developer Conference in June, banning apps “created from commercialized template or app generation service.”
ChowNow, which is quoted in Apple Pay documentation regarding its integration into the company’s platform for making restaurant apps is affected, and the company’s CEO told TechCrunch it was shocked to be categorized as spam.
Congressman Ted W. Lieu (D-CA) has asked Apple to reconsider its guidelines 4.2.6, relating to template-based apps, and 4.3, relating to duplicate content, in a letter dated Dec. 1.
“Recently, I was informed that Apple’s decision to more stringently enforce its policy guidelines regarding design and functionality may result in the wholesale rejection of template-based apps from the App Store,” wrote Lieu (per TechCrunch). “It is my understanding that many small businesses, research organizations, and religious institutions rely on template apps when they do not possess the resources to develop apps in-house.”
Apple’s partnership with IBM for

 

Wix increased its guidance on revenue and free cash flow for 2017 as it announced strong third-quarter results, including revenues of $111 million, which beat the high-end of its previous guidance.
The company added 188,000 net premium subscriptions, a 33 percent year-over-year increase to 3.1 million customers, according to the Wednesday announcement. The increases led to a 101 percent year-over-year growth in free cash flow, to $18.9 million. Along with year-over-year revenue growth of 47 percent in the quarter, collections grew 38 percent to over $120 million.
The release of Wix ADI (Artificial Design Intelligence) has had a material impact on the rate at which the company’s registered users have converted to paid subscriptions, Wix says.
“New product releases and continued improvements to existing products drove increases in conversion to the highest levels ever, leading to strong results this quarter,” Avishai Abrahami, co-founder and CEO of Wix said in a statement. “Most notably, ongoing development of the Wix Editor and Wix ADI contributed meaningfully to conversion improvements. With future improvements to and the localization of Wix ADI, the continued development of the Wix Editor and the upcoming public release of Wix Code, we have built a complete web development platform for any type of user that will continue to drive growth in our business.”
While growth in premium subscriptions drove revenue gains in the quarter, Wix also picked up

 

Wix increased its guidance on revenue and free cash flow for 2017 as it announced strong third-quarter results, including revenues of $111 million, which beat the high-end of its previous guidance.
The company added 188,000 net premium subscriptions, a 33 percent year-over-year increase to 3.1 million customers, according to the Wednesday announcement. The increases led to a 101 percent year-over-year growth in free cash flow, to $18.9 million. Along with year-over-year revenue growth of 47 percent in the quarter, collections grew 38 percent to over $120 million.
The release of Wix ADI (Artificial Design Intelligence) has had a material impact on the rate at which the company’s registered users have converted to paid subscriptions, Wix says.
“New product releases and continued improvements to existing products drove increases in conversion to the highest levels ever, leading to strong results this quarter,” Avishai Abrahami, co-founder and CEO of Wix said in a statement. “Most notably, ongoing development of the Wix Editor and Wix ADI contributed meaningfully to conversion improvements. With future improvements to and the localization of Wix ADI, the continued development of the Wix Editor and the upcoming public release of Wix Code, we have built a complete web development platform for any type of user that will continue to drive growth in our business.”
While growth in premium subscriptions drove revenue gains in the quarter, Wix also picked up

 

(Bloomberg) — Shopify Inc. Chief Executive Officer Tobi Lutke called a short seller that targeted his company a “troll,” in his first public response since being targeted by Andrew Left’s Citron Research last week.
Left, who said he had taken a short position in the stock, published a report on Oct. 4 questioning the sustainability of the Canadian e-commerce company’s growth rate and calling its marketing tactics illegal. Though Wall Street analysts overwhelmingly stood by Shopify and rejected Left’s claims, the company’s shares fell 12 percent, its biggest one-day decline since listing in May 2015.
See also: Shopify Tumbles as Citron Calls Company ‘Get-Rich-Quick Scheme’
“Lots of people want me to address the short-selling troll that’s targeting,” Shopify, Lutke tweeted Tuesday. “Looking forward to next earnings calls to do so.”
Shopify helps small merchants set up online stores. Citron’s report alleges the vast majority of them are recruited by promoters promising the website is an easy way to make money without doing much work, and that eventually the company’s growth will crumble when these merchants fail.
Left immediately responded to Lutke calling him a troll when contacted by Bloomberg, saying it “shows his immaturity as a CEO.”
“The irony of an outfit like Citron accusing any business of being a get-rich-quick scheme should not be lost on anyone,” Lutke added.

 

Cloud computing companies in the U.S. could lose more than $10 billion by 2020 as a result of the Trump administration’s reputation regarding data privacy, according to Swiss hosting company Artmotion.
A whitepaper published by Artmotion suggests that growth rate in U.S. cloud revenue relative to the rest of the world will decline significantly more than previously forecast by IDC.
See also: Tech Goes From White House to Doghouse in Trump’s Washington
IDC’s Worldwide Public Cloud Services Spending Guide predicts that the U.S. will account for 60 percent of cloud revenue worldwide to 2020. The same research, however, suggests revenue growth in the U.S. will be lower than that in all seven other regions analyzed by IDC, and according to Artmotion does not take into account the sharply falling confidence businesses have in the capacity of U.S. companies to protect the privacy of data in the cloud.
“While these figures may be concerning for U.S. service providers already, they don’t take full account of the scale of the disapproval of President Trump’s actions since taking office,” according to Mateo Meier, CEO of Artmotion.
Artmotion’s own research shows that half of U.S. and U.K. citizens feel online data privacy is less secure under President Trump. Further, 24 percent are most concerned about their own government, while only 20 percent consider the Russian government most concerning, and 15 percent fear the Chinese government. Both Russia and

 

Web hosting provider Codero has named John Martis president and CEO, the company announced today.
Martis will take over from current co-CEOs Leo Staurulakis and Bill King effective September 5, while Staurulakis and King will continue to sit on the company’s board of directors, with Staurulakis remaining as board chairman.
Martis’ track record includes founding ISP American Digital Network, which he built into a multi-million dollar company. He also draws on hosting industry experience from his time with Hostway, which transitioned from a shared hosting focus to dedicated servers and managed hosting under his leadership, and Abacus America (Aplus.Net), for which he oversaw data center operations, system engineering and software development as executive vice president. In 2013, when current Hostway president and CEO Emil Sayegh was CEO of Codero, Martis was president and CEO of Hostway.
“Codero provides sophisticated products at scale so that all companies, regardless of size, can leverage advanced IT solutions at their own pace,” Bill King, current Codero co-CEO and a member of Codero’s board of directors, said. “John’s proven track record of engaging customers and leveraging strategic partnerships will be instrumental in Codero’s continued growth.”
“Codero has the rare combination of passionate customers, leading products and remarkable employees,” Martis said. “Codero’s dedication to market innovation and providing best-in-class

 

Scott Wagner will take over from Blake Irving as CEO of GoDaddy following Irving’s retirement from the role at the end of 2017, according to a Tuesday announcement. Wagner moves over from his current role as president and chief operating officer, while Irving will continue to sit on GoDaddy’s board of directors until mid-2018.
“After more than three decades in technology, I’ve decided it’s time to retire and begin the next phase of my life,” said Irving. ”Over the last five years, we’ve assembled a seasoned and diverse leadership team, and expanded our reach around the world, now serving customers in 125 countries with purpose-build products – all while doubling our revenue and profits. GoDaddy’s trajectory is clear and our momentum strong.  It is the perfect time to transition leadership to Scott Wagner. I couldn’t be prouder of what the company has accomplished, and I am equally excited about what the company will achieve under Scott’s leadership.”
In Golden Era of Development, Business is Good for Web Professionals
Wagner spent 13 years at private equity firm KKR, including as partner, and when it invested in GoDaddy in 2011 Wagner served as interim CEO of GoDaddy, before becoming GoDaddy CFO and COO when Irving was appointed. He remained COO on being appointed president in 2016, which expanded his responsibility for go-to-market channels marketing, customer care, international markets, and corporate

 

Endurance International Group has announced that its board of directors has appointed Jeffrey H. Fox as president and chief executive officer, effective August 22.
Fox, who will also join the company’s board of directors, succeeds Endurance founder Hari Ravichandran.
“Jeff’s extensive experience leading strategy and operations for organizations in the technology, information services, and telecom industries make him ideally suited to lead the company as it focuses on balancing operational execution with profitable growth and free cash flow generation,” said James C. Neary, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Endurance International Group.
Executive leadership experience Fox brings to Endurance includes a stint from 2010 to 2012 as CEO of Convergys Corporation, and he has served since then as chairman of the board. He founded and is currently a principle of investment and advisory firm The Circumference Group LLC. Fox also previously served as COO, Group President – Shared Services, and Group President – Alltel Information Services for Alltel Corporation.
“I am excited to begin working with the board and the talented team at Endurance,” said Fox. “I have a deep appreciation for the dedication that has gone into building this company and am honored to have been selected to guide it through its next phase.”
The company announced in April it had adopted a plan to transition to a new “CEO who can take Endurance to the

 

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In small print, it’s nearly impossible to discern that the “e” in the sender’s google.com domain is not the Latin “e” used to write English, but rather the nearly identical-looking Cyrillic “e” used in Russian and other Slavic languages.
As a result, the fake security alert about the recipient’s linked Google account looks legitimate enough to inspire a click – even by someone reasonably well trained in avoiding phishing scams.
The notion that training alone is increasingly not enough to protect organizations is at the core of Inky Phish Fence, an Office 365 add-in or Chrome extension for G Suite that uses machine learning technology to instantly analyze emails for subtle discrepancies and other signs that could signal phishing.
“Training is predicated on the idea that the human user is going to catch stuff,” said David Baggett, founder and CEO of Inky, maker of Inky Phish Fence. “Instead of a human, you have to have a computer to catch it; you have to have a progam do it.
“Inky is the first program that we know of that does that.”
Often the first step of lucrative malware attacks, phishing is quickly becoming a very intricate affair.
“We’re seeing phishing attacks that are really resistant to training,” he said.
He pointed to cases of phishing attacks even less “sophisticated” than the Cyrillic “e” example above.
In the small print of an email graphic, cybercriminals artfully substitute “cl” for

 

Brought to you by MSPmentor
In small print, it’s nearly impossible to discern that the “e” in the sender’s google.com domain is not the Latin “e” used to write English, but rather the nearly identical-looking Cyrillic “e” used in Russian and other Slavic languages.
As a result, the fake security alert about the recipient’s linked Google account looks legitimate enough to inspire a click – even by someone reasonably well trained in avoiding phishing scams.
The notion that training alone is increasingly not enough to protect organizations is at the core of Inky Phish Fence, an Office 365 add-in or Chrome extension for G Suite that uses machine learning technology to instantly analyze emails for subtle discrepancies and other signs that could signal phishing.
“Training is predicated on the idea that the human user is going to catch stuff,” said David Baggett, founder and CEO of Inky, maker of Inky Phish Fence. “Instead of a human, you have to have a computer to catch it; you have to have a progam do it.
“Inky is the first program that we know of that does that.”
Often the first step of lucrative malware attacks, phishing is quickly becoming a very intricate affair.
“We’re seeing phishing attacks that are really resistant to training,” he said.
He pointed to cases of phishing attacks even less “sophisticated” than the Cyrillic “e” example above.
In the small print of an email graphic, cybercriminals artfully substitute “cl” for

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