A judge in District of Columbia Superior Court has rolled back the scope of the original warrant that required DreamHost to hand over data belonging to users of anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
Under a new order, DreamHost will provide a redacted set of data that aims to protect non-subscribers to the website, which is allegedly linked to rioting during the presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C.
On Tuesday Chief Judge Morin said that the court will incorporate “procedural safeguards to comply with First Amendment and Fourth Amendment considerations.”
Under the order, DreamHost will provide the government with all information for the account disruptj20.org, but can redact the user identifying information of any non-subscribers who visited or communicated through the website. DreamHost will be required to hold onto non-redacted copies of the lists should the court order the hosting company to provide any of the non-redactions to the government in the future.
The order comes more than a month after DreamHost talked to The WHIR as it considered its next move.
The government also has to wait until it gets court approval to begin its review of the redacted materials, explaining how it will conduct its review, the intended search protocols, as well as its plan for permanently deleting all data not within the scope of the warrant. The full order can be read here.
In a statement provided to The WHIR, DreamHost general counsel Chris Ghazarian said:
Chief Judge

 

DreamHost is considering its next move after a judge last week ordered the Los Angeles-based web hosting company to comply with a government warrant seeking information about subscribers to the anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
DreamHost’s general counsel Chris Ghazarian said that while overall he sees the decision as a win, the company would have preferred even more content being removed from the warrant or the warrant being invalidated all together.
“Now our team and I are considering our next steps which are essentially whether or not we are going to appeal, and we’ll make that decision very soon,” Ghazarian said in an interview with The WHIR.
Chief Judge Robert Morin ruled on Thursday that DreamHost had to turn over subscriber data, but under a much narrower scope than first anticipated. Morin told the District of Columbia Superior Court that in an order to “balance the First Amendment protections and the government’s need for this information” he would oversee which data prosecutors’ intend to seize and use of the data to ensure it is limited to individuals connected to the riots.
Ghazarian said that the Department of Justice (DoJ) pulled back quite a bit in what they initially asked for, including removing the request for IP addresses.
“The entire process overall has been a win because I don’t think anybody really expected the government number one to back down from their original warrant, especially since we tried to have a professional

 

DreamHost is considering its next move after a judge last week ordered the Los Angeles-based web hosting company to comply with a government warrant seeking information about subscribers to the anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
DreamHost’s general counsel Chris Ghazarian said that while overall he sees the decision as a win, the company would have preferred even more content being removed from the warrant or the warrant being invalidated all together.
“Now our team and I are considering our next steps which are essentially whether or not we are going to appeal, and we’ll make that decision very soon,” Ghazarian said in an interview with The WHIR.
Chief Judge Robert Morin ruled on Thursday that DreamHost had to turn over subscriber data, but under a much narrower scope than first anticipated. Morin told the District of Columbia Superior Court that in an order to “balance the First Amendment protections and the government’s need for this information” he would oversee which data prosecutors’ intend to seize and use of the data to ensure it is limited to individuals connected to the riots.
Ghazarian said that the Department of Justice (DoJ) pulled back quite a bit in what they initially asked for, including removing the request for IP addresses.
“The entire process overall has been a win because I don’t think anybody really expected the government number one to back down from their original warrant, especially since we tried to have a professional

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