A judge in District of Columbia Superior Court has rolled back the scope of the original warrant that required DreamHost to hand over data belonging to users of anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
Under a new order, DreamHost will provide a redacted set of data that aims to protect non-subscribers to the website, which is allegedly linked to rioting during the presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C.
On Tuesday Chief Judge Morin said that the court will incorporate “procedural safeguards to comply with First Amendment and Fourth Amendment considerations.”
Under the order, DreamHost will provide the government with all information for the account disruptj20.org, but can redact the user identifying information of any non-subscribers who visited or communicated through the website. DreamHost will be required to hold onto non-redacted copies of the lists should the court order the hosting company to provide any of the non-redactions to the government in the future.
The order comes more than a month after DreamHost talked to The WHIR as it considered its next move.
The government also has to wait until it gets court approval to begin its review of the redacted materials, explaining how it will conduct its review, the intended search protocols, as well as its plan for permanently deleting all data not within the scope of the warrant. The full order can be read here.
In a statement provided to The WHIR, DreamHost general counsel Chris Ghazarian said:
Chief Judge

 

DreamHost is considering its next move after a judge last week ordered the Los Angeles-based web hosting company to comply with a government warrant seeking information about subscribers to the anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
DreamHost’s general counsel Chris Ghazarian said that while overall he sees the decision as a win, the company would have preferred even more content being removed from the warrant or the warrant being invalidated all together.
“Now our team and I are considering our next steps which are essentially whether or not we are going to appeal, and we’ll make that decision very soon,” Ghazarian said in an interview with The WHIR.
Chief Judge Robert Morin ruled on Thursday that DreamHost had to turn over subscriber data, but under a much narrower scope than first anticipated. Morin told the District of Columbia Superior Court that in an order to “balance the First Amendment protections and the government’s need for this information” he would oversee which data prosecutors’ intend to seize and use of the data to ensure it is limited to individuals connected to the riots.
Ghazarian said that the Department of Justice (DoJ) pulled back quite a bit in what they initially asked for, including removing the request for IP addresses.
“The entire process overall has been a win because I don’t think anybody really expected the government number one to back down from their original warrant, especially since we tried to have a professional

 

DreamHost is considering its next move after a judge last week ordered the Los Angeles-based web hosting company to comply with a government warrant seeking information about subscribers to the anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
DreamHost’s general counsel Chris Ghazarian said that while overall he sees the decision as a win, the company would have preferred even more content being removed from the warrant or the warrant being invalidated all together.
“Now our team and I are considering our next steps which are essentially whether or not we are going to appeal, and we’ll make that decision very soon,” Ghazarian said in an interview with The WHIR.
Chief Judge Robert Morin ruled on Thursday that DreamHost had to turn over subscriber data, but under a much narrower scope than first anticipated. Morin told the District of Columbia Superior Court that in an order to “balance the First Amendment protections and the government’s need for this information” he would oversee which data prosecutors’ intend to seize and use of the data to ensure it is limited to individuals connected to the riots.
Ghazarian said that the Department of Justice (DoJ) pulled back quite a bit in what they initially asked for, including removing the request for IP addresses.
“The entire process overall has been a win because I don’t think anybody really expected the government number one to back down from their original warrant, especially since we tried to have a professional

 

(Bloomberg) — U.S. prosecutors prevailed in their request to seek information about subscribers to an anti-Trump website allegedly linked to rioting during the presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C.
A judge in District of Columbia Superior Court on Thursday ordered DreamHost LLC, the host of the website disruptj20.org, to comply with a government warrant seeking information about the site’s subscribers. The government says the site was used to recruit and organize hundreds of people who rioted in the city on Jan. 20, the day President Donald Trump was sworn in, causing hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage over nearly two dozen city blocks.
DreamHost Launches Crowdfunding Campaign to Cover Legal Costs in DOJ Fight
Chief Judge Robert Morin ruled that DreamHost was obligated to turn over subscriber data, but that prosecutors would have to tell the judge which data it intended to seize. The judge said he would oversee the use of the data to make sure the government’s seizure was limited to individuals linked to the riots and not people who merely posted messages or communicated with others through the site.
“I’m trying to balance the First Amendment protections and the government’s need for this information,” Morin said. “My view here is that this best protects both legitimate interests.”
Morin denied DreamHost’s request to put his ruling on hold until they could appeal his decision.
Host’s Refusal
The ruling on Thursday came after

 

DreamHost has set up a crowdfunding campaign to raise $10,000 for its legal fight against the U.S. Department of Justice.
The DOJ is attempting to force DreamHost to provide it with website information, including logs identifying the IPs of all site visitors, for disruptj20.org, which was used to organize protests during the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Over 200 people were arrested during the protest, which included violence and property destruction.
The crowdfunding campaign is being run through CrowdJustice, a website dedicated to funding legal costs, and has received pledges for nearly 40 percent of its $10,000 goal as of mid-day Tuesday for in-house and outside counsel costs. The campaign is scheduled to close Sept. 16. DreamHost says it will donate any leftover funds to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) in recognition of its support.
“No plausible explanation exists for a search warrant of this breadth, other than to cast a digital dragnet as broadly as possible. But the Fourth Amendment was designed to prohibit fishing expeditions like this,” EFF Senior Staff Attorney Mark Rumold wrote in a statement on the group’s website. “Those concerns are especially relevant here, where DOJ is investigating a website that served as a hub for the planning and exercise of First Amendment-protected activities.”
DreamHost’s challenge of the DOJ request was originally scheduled to be heard last Friday by Chief Judge Robert E. Morin of the Superior

 

New York’s proposed Bitcoin regulation would violate the First Amendment, damage privacy and stifle innovation, according to Reddit, The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the Internet Archive. The groups published a joint comment at the close of the public comment period on Tuesday.

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