A judge in District of Columbia Superior Court has rolled back the scope of the original warrant that required DreamHost to hand over data belonging to users of anti-Trump website disruptj20.org.
Under a new order, DreamHost will provide a redacted set of data that aims to protect non-subscribers to the website, which is allegedly linked to rioting during the presidential inauguration in Washington, D.C.
On Tuesday Chief Judge Morin said that the court will incorporate “procedural safeguards to comply with First Amendment and Fourth Amendment considerations.”
Under the order, DreamHost will provide the government with all information for the account disruptj20.org, but can redact the user identifying information of any non-subscribers who visited or communicated through the website. DreamHost will be required to hold onto non-redacted copies of the lists should the court order the hosting company to provide any of the non-redactions to the government in the future.
The order comes more than a month after DreamHost talked to The WHIR as it considered its next move.
The government also has to wait until it gets court approval to begin its review of the redacted materials, explaining how it will conduct its review, the intended search protocols, as well as its plan for permanently deleting all data not within the scope of the warrant. The full order can be read here.
In a statement provided to The WHIR, DreamHost general counsel Chris Ghazarian said:
Chief Judge

 

DreamHost has set up a crowdfunding campaign to raise $10,000 for its legal fight against the U.S. Department of Justice.
The DOJ is attempting to force DreamHost to provide it with website information, including logs identifying the IPs of all site visitors, for disruptj20.org, which was used to organize protests during the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Over 200 people were arrested during the protest, which included violence and property destruction.
The crowdfunding campaign is being run through CrowdJustice, a website dedicated to funding legal costs, and has received pledges for nearly 40 percent of its $10,000 goal as of mid-day Tuesday for in-house and outside counsel costs. The campaign is scheduled to close Sept. 16. DreamHost says it will donate any leftover funds to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) in recognition of its support.
“No plausible explanation exists for a search warrant of this breadth, other than to cast a digital dragnet as broadly as possible. But the Fourth Amendment was designed to prohibit fishing expeditions like this,” EFF Senior Staff Attorney Mark Rumold wrote in a statement on the group’s website. “Those concerns are especially relevant here, where DOJ is investigating a website that served as a hub for the planning and exercise of First Amendment-protected activities.”
DreamHost’s challenge of the DOJ request was originally scheduled to be heard last Friday by Chief Judge Robert E. Morin of the Superior

 

(The Hosting News) – In the wake of the recent NSA info gathering leak, the i2Coalition, a unified voice for the hosting community, on Wednesday issued a statement. Below is what Co-Founder Christian Dawson had to say:

““This country faces a delicate balance every day between security and an open Internet. Those of us who work in the Internet infrastructure industry find ourselves at the center of this challenge on a regular basis. Recent news stories create uncertainty and doubt in the minds of many of our customers, especially as we compete on the global stage. The i2Coalition believes that there must be greater transparency about U.S. government access to online data.

“The i2Coalition supports efforts to declassify the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court’s order related to the National Security Agency’s information gathering program that has recently been the focus of public attention. While we must continue to respect the need for accurate intelligence to safeguard our nation’s security, we also need the opportunity for an open, robust discussion of how to do so while respecting personal privacy and Internet freedom. We will continue to advocate for laws and regulations that preserve Fourth Amendment protections, including judicial review and particularized suspicion as conditions of any warrants.”

Source: i2Coalition Talks NSA/PRISM Controversy

 

(The Hosting News) – In the wake of the recent NSA info gathering leak, the i2Coalition, a unified voice for the hosting community, on Wednesday issued a statement. Below is what Co-Founder Christian Dawson had to say:

““This country faces a delicate balance every day between security and an open Internet. Those of us who work in the Internet infrastructure industry find ourselves at the center of this challenge on a regular basis. Recent news stories create uncertainty and doubt in the minds of many of our customers, especially as we compete on the global stage. The i2Coalition believes that there must be greater transparency about U.S. government access to online data.

“The i2Coalition supports efforts to declassify the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court’s order related to the National Security Agency’s information gathering program that has recently been the focus of public attention. While we must continue to respect the need for accurate intelligence to safeguard our nation’s security, we also need the opportunity for an open, robust discussion of how to do so while respecting personal privacy and Internet freedom. We will continue to advocate for laws and regulations that preserve Fourth Amendment protections, including judicial review and particularized suspicion as conditions of any warrants.”

Source: i2Coalition Talks NSA/PRISM Controversy

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