(Bloomberg) — Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. is planning to cut about 10 percent of its staff, or at least 5,000 workers, according to people familiar with the matter, part of a broader effort to pare expenses as competition mounts.
The reductions are expected to start before the end of the year, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the matter is private. The cuts at the company, which has about 50,000 workers, are likely to affect workers in the U.S. and abroad, including managers, the people said. A Hewlett Packard Enterprise representative didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.
Chief Executive Officer Meg Whitman has been jettisoning divisions since 2015, including personal computers, printers, business services and key software units. The moves are all part of an effort to make HPE more responsive to a changing industry that’s under pressure from cloud providers such as Amazon.com Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google.
On a call with analysts earlier this month, Whitman said the Palo Alto, California-based company is benefiting from growing demand across key areas of the business. At the same time, she said she’s pushing to cut “layers” in the organization and become more efficient.
“With fewer lines of business and clear strategic priorities, we have the opportunity to create an internal structure and operating model that is simpler, nimbler and faster,” she said.
On the same call, Chief Financial Officer Tim Stonesifer

 

(Bloomberg) — Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. is planning to cut about 10 percent of its staff, or at least 5,000 workers, according to people familiar with the matter, part of a broader effort to pare expenses as competition mounts.
The reductions are expected to start before the end of the year, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the matter is private. The cuts at the company, which has about 50,000 workers, are likely to affect workers in the U.S. and abroad, including managers, the people said. A Hewlett Packard Enterprise representative didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.
Chief Executive Officer Meg Whitman has been jettisoning divisions since 2015, including personal computers, printers, business services and key software units. The moves are all part of an effort to make HPE more responsive to a changing industry that’s under pressure from cloud providers such as Amazon.com Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google.
On a call with analysts earlier this month, Whitman said the Palo Alto, California-based company is benefiting from growing demand across key areas of the business. At the same time, she said she’s pushing to cut “layers” in the organization and become more efficient.
“With fewer lines of business and clear strategic priorities, we have the opportunity to create an internal structure and operating model that is simpler, nimbler and faster,” she said.
On the same call, Chief Financial Officer Tim Stonesifer

 

HPE CEO Meg Whitman has joined the board of directors at Dropbox, according to a blog post by Dropbox CEO Drew Houston. Whitman will remain in her role with HPE, having left the board of HP Inc. in July.
Calling Whitman “a trusted friend and advisor to me for years,” Houston said that Whitman’s experience and judgment will help the company scale.
“Last year, we had the chance to work together when Dropbox partnered with HPE to build our own cloud infrastructure,” wrote Houston. “And since HPE is a Dropbox customer, Meg knows our products well.”
Dropbox’s decided to move mostly off of AWS, and partner with HPE in early 2016 after building out its own infrastructure for over two years. Since then, Dropbox has launched new points-of-presence in Europe, Asia, and the U.S., and as of late last year was storing 90 percent of customer data on its custom-built “Magic Pocket” architecture.
Whitman was reportedly a finalist for the position of new CEO of Uber in August, before the company selected Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi. She has previously served on the boards of several organizations, including the eBay Foundation, Goldman Sachs, and currently sits on the board of directors at Zipcar and Procter & Gamble. She was also the Republican nominee for Governor of California in 2010.
Dropbox secured a $600 million credit facility earlier this year, Bloomberg reports, and is rumored to be preparing for an initial public offering as soon as this year, and

 

Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) has reached an agreement to acquire cloud consultancy Cloud Technology Partners (CTP) to grow the capabilities of its hybrid IT service HPE Pointnext, the companies announced today.
Boston-based CTP, which was founded in 2010, launched AWS environment migration and management solution Cloud KickStart in 2017 to help enterprises get workloads into public cloud environments. It also offers the Managed Cloud Controls suite to enable compliance and cost management of multi-cloud environments. Adding CTP’s capabilities expands HPE’s ability to help enterprise clients move to the cloud, according to the announcement.
See also: HPE and VMware Team Up on Composable Infrastructure, Hybrid Cloud
In a letter to CTP employees, HPE CEO Meg Whitman said the three core pillars of the companies’ strategy are simplifying hybrid IT through software-defined infrastructure, powering the “intelligent edge” to run campus, branch, and IoT applications, and providing expertise and flexible consumption models for transforming IT environments.
“I believe CTP, with your deep IP and expertise, will play a critical role in helping HPE even more effectively execute its strategy and provide the comprehensive technology solutions our joint customers are looking for,” Whitman wrote. “Joining forces with HPE will give CTP the ability to scale globally, accelerate your roadmap and become part of a larger like-minded community.”
HPE Pointnext SVP

 

Brought to you by Data Center Knowledge
Hewlett Packard Enterprise is joining forces with VMware to offer composable infrastructure based on HPE Synergy and VMware Cloud Foundation. The integration is called, simply enough, VMware Cloud Foundation on HPE Synergy, and HPE is touting it as the industry’s first composable platform using VMware’s software-defined data center (SDDC) platform. The companies made the announcement at VMworld in Las Vegas on Tuesday.
This is all about the hybrid cloud of course, which providers have come to see as the brass ring for attracting enterprise clients. The solution promises to simplify transformations to a hybrid infrastructure by enabling single-click deployment of traditional and private cloud workloads and allows infrastructure to be dynamically reallocated in minutes.
“In today’s competitive digital world, enterprises need technology that enables them to quickly introduce and scale new services,” Ric Lewis, senior VP and general manager of HPE’s Software-Defined and Cloud Group, said in a statement. “HPE Synergy with VMware Cloud Foundation will deliver a private cloud experience that empowers IT to be an internal service provider and enables rapid response to business needs with single-click DevOps delivery.”
Although the announcement is short on details about how the integration will work in practice, on the surface at least, this would seem to be a natural pairing.
HPE Synergy is an all-in-one hardware

 

(Bloomberg) — Space Exploration Technologies Corp. will carry a Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co. computing system that is designed to last longer and may help pave the way for extended periods of space travel, such as the journey to Mars.
SpaceX will take the system, a box that can process data from experiments, on its Dragon Spacecraft that will be launched from Cape Canaveral on Aug. 14 to the International Space Station.
Other computing systems used in space have to be replaced frequently because the difficult conditions caused them to degrade, a spokesman for Hewlett Packard said. Its Spaceborne Computer is designed to last for a year, which it says is roughly the amount of time it would take to travel to Mars. NASA aims to send humans to Mars in the 2030s.
“A mission to Mars will require sophisticated on-board computing resources that are capable of extended periods of uptime,” Alain Andreoli, senior vice president and General Manager at Hewlett Packard’s Data Center Infrastructure Group, said in a blog post.
“To meet these requirements, we need to improve technology’s viability in space in order to better ensure mission success,” Andreoli said. “By sending a supercomputer to space, HPE is taking the first step in that direction.”

 

Brought to you by IT Pro
Azure Stack will finally be ready to ship in September. Microsoft announced that its partners Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo are taking orders as of Monday.
Microsoft made the announcement at its Microsoft Inspire 2017 conference taking place in Washington, D.C. this week. Microsoft said it has delivered the Azure Stack software to its partners, which allows it to begin the certification process for their integrated systems.
Azure Stack allows customers to run Azure services on-premises, giving customers control over where applications and workloads reside. Applications can be built and deployed using the same approaches in Azure Stack as if they were being deployed to Azure public cloud.  Because of this, Microsoft said it enables “a truly consistent hybrid cloud platform.”
At Microsoft’s partner conference last year it delivered news about Azure Stack that irritated customers; Microsoft announced that customers would have to buy certified hardware from select partners, instead of running on customers’ own servers as initially promised.
According to a recent report by ITPro, “The goal of the [Azure Stack] appliance is you do not worry about the operating systems/software/configuration of the appliance, that is all managed for you and you focus is utilizing its capabilities.” 
Microsoft also released details on pricing for the pay-as-you-use and capacity-based models. The Azure Stack Development Kit (ADSK) is available for download

 

Microsoft announced that its partners Dell EMC, HPE and Lenovo are taking orders as of Monday.

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