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Accenture left four Amazon Web Services (AWS) S3 buckets open and downloadable to the public, containing software for its Accenture Cloud Platform enterprise cloud offering and other sensitive internal data, security researchers said today.
The unsecured AWS S3 buckets were discovered by UpGuard security researcher Chris Vickery on Sept. 17, 2017, and revealed “significant internal Accenture data, including cloud platform credentials and configurations.” Credentials for Accenture’s Google and Azure accounts also appeared to be stored in one of the buckets, which could have far-reaching consequences in the hands of a malicious actor.
The servers were secured the next day after UpGuard Director of Cyber Risk Research Vickery notified Accenture.
The company, which provides consulting and professional services, is not the first to have had unsecured AWS S3 buckets discovered by UpGuard. Earlier this year, Vickery notified Verizon, and election data firm Deep Root Analytics about AWS S3 buckets open to the public, exposing tens of millions of customer and voter records, respectively.
In a blog post on Tuesday, Vickery said that this exposure could have been prevented with a simple password requirement added to each bucket. His recommendation comes as a new survey by OneLogin finds that IT pros are failing to enforce password policies.
Accenture’s AWS S3 buckets contained internal access keys and credentials for use by the Identity API, plaintext

 

Brought to you by ITPro
Accenture left four Amazon Web Services (AWS) S3 buckets open and downloadable to the public, containing software for its Accenture Cloud Platform enterprise cloud offering and other sensitive internal data, security researchers said today.
The unsecured AWS S3 buckets were discovered by UpGuard security researcher Chris Vickery on Sept. 17, 2017, and revealed “significant internal Accenture data, including cloud platform credentials and configurations.” Credentials for Accenture’s Google and Azure accounts also appeared to be stored in one of the buckets, which could have far-reaching consequences in the hands of a malicious actor.
The servers were secured the next day after UpGuard Director of Cyber Risk Research Vickery notified Accenture.
The company, which provides consulting and professional services, is not the first to have had unsecured AWS S3 buckets discovered by UpGuard. Earlier this year, Vickery notified Verizon, and election data firm Deep Root Analytics about AWS S3 buckets open to the public, exposing tens of millions of customer and voter records, respectively.
In a blog post on Tuesday, Vickery said that this exposure could have been prevented with a simple password requirement added to each bucket. His recommendation comes as a new survey by OneLogin finds that IT pros are failing to enforce password policies.
Accenture’s AWS S3 buckets contained internal access keys and credentials for use by the Identity API, plaintext

 

The cost of cyberattacks on large businesses in North America increased to an average of $1.3 million in 2017, according to research released this week by Kaspersky Labs.
The report IT Security: cost-center or strategic investment? shows the share of global IT budgets going to security rose from 17 percent (16 percent in North America) in 2016 to 20 percent this year (18 percent in North America), indicating an increase in the perceived importance of IT security.
Kaspersky said that spending increased across businesses of all sizes as a reflection of businesses starting to consider IT security as a strategic investment. While they increased as a share of overall IT budgets, global IT security spending actually dropped dramatically, according to Kaspersky, from $25.5 million in 2016 to $13.7 million this year.
See also: The U.S. Kaspersky Ban Sets an Ugly Precedent
That would seem to suggest that global IT budgets overall fell from an average of $150 million last year to a mere $68.5 million this year – a shocking development if true. Gartner forecasts global IT spending will increase by 2.4 percent from 2016 to 2017.
Kaspersky found that globally, cyberattacks cost an average of $992,000 for large businesses in 2017, up from $861,000 in 2016, and cost SMBs $87,800 this year, up from $86,500 last year, according to a blog post.
“While cybersecurity incidents involving third parties prove to be harmful to businesses of all sizes, their financial impact on a company has

 

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Large enterprises are losing hundreds of millions of dollars each year because they don’t have the right cloud expertise in place to deploy cloud platforms quick enough, according to a report released by Rackspace today.
In The Cost of Cloud Expertise survey, Rackspace finds that businesses with over 1,000 employees are losing more than $258 million – or 5 percent of total global revenue – annually because of a lack of cloud expertise.
According to the survey, which was released in collaboration with LSE academics and Vanson Bourne, 40 percent of IT decision makers are concerned that they are unable to keep pace with the demands of cloud technology, including having the right expertise in place to maximize their cloud ROI.
Sixty-five percent of IT pros believe that with the right cloud expertise they could bring greater innovation to their organization. But the reality is, 44 percent of IT pros spend more time managing their organization’s cloud services than they initially expected, which means they are spending less time on more strategic projects. Of course, being a managed cloud service provider, Rackspace recommends that organizations outsource cloud management to free IT staff to focus on innovation.
Finding the right people to fill these cloud roles is not an easy task, according to the report, which finds on average it takes five weeks to fill an open role on an IT team. But the outlook is improving as both IT pros (68 percent) and

 

Enterprise Kubernetes company Heptio announced Wednesday it has raised $25 million in Series B funding to accelerate its growth and extend its services for hybrid cloud transformation beyond the Kubernetes project.
Heptio founders Joe Beda and Craig McLuckie created Kubernetes along with Brendan Burns while they were with Google. The company provides training, professional services, and products to integrate Kubernetes and related technologies with enterprise IT and reduce the cost and complexity of running them in production environments.
See also: Cloud and Web Hosting Industry Trends in Private Equity Investment
Kubernetes, the open source container automation platform developed by Google, has become the industry’s de facto standard for orchestrating and managing containers, according to the announcement.
“Kubernetes really speaks to systems engineers, but there is a huge body of work to do to make it truly accessible to engineers who don’t necessarily have the time to ‘dig into’ the details of the project,” wrote McLuckie, Heptio CEO, in a blog post. “Upstream versions of Kubernetes remain inaccessible to many from an operations and accessibility perspective. It is still too hard to deploy a Kubernetes cluster, qualify whether it is conformant, and stitch it into the fabric of enterprise IT systems.”
Heptio will use the capital to “dramatically scale” its team and launch new products to make Kubernetes more accessible to developers and operators.

 

Enterprise Kubernetes company Heptio announced Wednesday it has raised $25 million in Series B funding to accelerate its growth and extend its services for hybrid cloud transformation beyond the Kubernetes project.
Heptio founders Joe Beda and Craig McLuckie created Kubernetes along with Brendan Burns while they were with Google. The company provides training, professional services, and products to integrate Kubernetes and related technologies with enterprise IT and reduce the cost and complexity of running them in production environments.
See also: Cloud and Web Hosting Industry Trends in Private Equity Investment
Kubernetes, the open source container automation platform developed by Google, has become the industry’s de facto standard for orchestrating and managing containers, according to the announcement.
“Kubernetes really speaks to systems engineers, but there is a huge body of work to do to make it truly accessible to engineers who don’t necessarily have the time to ‘dig into’ the details of the project,” wrote McLuckie, Heptio CEO, in a blog post. “Upstream versions of Kubernetes remain inaccessible to many from an operations and accessibility perspective. It is still too hard to deploy a Kubernetes cluster, qualify whether it is conformant, and stitch it into the fabric of enterprise IT systems.”
Heptio will use the capital to “dramatically scale” its team and launch new products to make Kubernetes more accessible to developers and operators.

 

I feel like I’m having this conversation on an almost daily basis. Organizations want to move to cloud, modernize their data centers, and find news ways to create efficiency and infrastructure savings. Cloud computing has been a great way to make this happen. Moving to a subscription-type model isn’t only limited to software or cloud solutions. Organizations can now leverage hybrid cloud options and offload entire data center operations into an OPEX model.
Growth around cloud will only continue to increase. Specifically, IT spending is steadily shifting from traditional IT offerings to cloud services (cloud shift), according to Gartner. The aggregate amount of cloud shift in 2016 rose to $111 billion, and is projected to increase to $216 billion in 2020.
Furthermore, Gartner analysts said that by 2020, cloud, hosting and traditional infrastructure services will come in more or less at par in terms of spending.
“As the demand for agility and flexibility grows, organizations will shift toward more industrialized, less-tailored options,” said DD Mishra, research director at Gartner. “Organizations that adopt hybrid infrastructure will optimize costs and increase efficiency. However, it increases the complexity of selecting the right toolset to deliver end-to-end services in a multisourced environment.”
Gartner predicts that by 2020, 90 percent of organizations will adopt hybrid infrastructure management capabilities.
There is no question that IT and

 

Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) has reached an agreement to acquire cloud consultancy Cloud Technology Partners (CTP) to grow the capabilities of its hybrid IT service HPE Pointnext, the companies announced today.
Boston-based CTP, which was founded in 2010, launched AWS environment migration and management solution Cloud KickStart in 2017 to help enterprises get workloads into public cloud environments. It also offers the Managed Cloud Controls suite to enable compliance and cost management of multi-cloud environments. Adding CTP’s capabilities expands HPE’s ability to help enterprise clients move to the cloud, according to the announcement.
See also: HPE and VMware Team Up on Composable Infrastructure, Hybrid Cloud
In a letter to CTP employees, HPE CEO Meg Whitman said the three core pillars of the companies’ strategy are simplifying hybrid IT through software-defined infrastructure, powering the “intelligent edge” to run campus, branch, and IoT applications, and providing expertise and flexible consumption models for transforming IT environments.
“I believe CTP, with your deep IP and expertise, will play a critical role in helping HPE even more effectively execute its strategy and provide the comprehensive technology solutions our joint customers are looking for,” Whitman wrote. “Joining forces with HPE will give CTP the ability to scale globally, accelerate your roadmap and become part of a larger like-minded community.”
HPE Pointnext SVP

 

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There’s a new release of OpenStack, the open source infrastructure-as-a-service platform for cloud computing. The new release, Pike, isn’t chock-full of new features, as OpenStack’s focus for the next several releases will be on stability, scalability, performance and ease-of-use.
Actually, this is a good time for the platform’s developers to step away from any mad rush to add new features and concentrate on improving the basics. Back in April, when we reported on Open Stack’s ninth User Survey, we noted that although use of the platform was on the rise, in some cases user satisfaction was declining, most likely over usability issues.
The most notable improvement to Pike, according to at least one media pundit, is that the new OpenStack is easier to deploy and update. If true — I haven’t been brave enough to try installing OpenStack yet — this will be welcome news throughout the data centers where the platform is deployed. Simply put, it has a reputation of being a bear to deploy and just as difficult to update.
OpenStack is becoming easier for IT organizations to incorporate into their plans in other ways as well.
“With new delivery models like private-cloud-as-a-service, it’s easier than ever to adopt OpenStack through the open source ecosystem where users are not locked into a proprietary technology or single vendor,” the OpenStack Foundation said in a statement.

 

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SolarWinds MSP announced Tuesday that it has acquired SpamExperts, an Amsterdam-based mail security solutions provider. The terms of the deal have not been disclosed.
Founded in 2005, SpamExperts offers SaaS-based mail protection and mail archiving services for IT service providers, including web hosts, MSPs, ISPs and telcos. In a statement, SolarWinds MSP says that SpamExperts will augment its SolarWinds MSP Mail offering, promising to provide more details in the next 30 days.
See also: SpamExperts Releases Open Source Anti-Spam Framework OrangeAssassin
In an email to partners, posted to the Web Hosting Talk forum, SpamExperts said that the acquisition will bring no immediate changes, only more opportunities.

We have some exciting news to share with you.
SpamExperts has been acquired by SolarWinds® MSP the leading global provider of comprehensive, scalable IT service management solutions.
As you know, SpamExperts has provided SaaS-based mail protection and mail archiving services for best-in-class MSPs, ISPs, telcos, and other IT service providers globally for more than ten years. SolarWinds MSP empowers more than 20,000 IT service providers worldwide with technologies to fuel their success. Solutions that integrate layered security, collective intelligence, and smart automation—both on-premises and in the cloud, backed by actionable data insights, help IT service providers get the job done easier and faster. SolarWinds MSP

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