(Bloomberg) — In the race to commercialize a new type of powerful computer, Microsoft Corp. has just pulled up to the starting line with a slick-looking set of wheels. There’s just one problem: it doesn’t have an engine – at least not yet. The Redmond, Washington-based tech giant is competing with Alphabet Inc.’s Google, International Business Machines Corp. and a clutch of small, specialized companies to develop quantum computers – machines that, in theory, will be many times more powerful than existing computers by bending the laws of physics.

Microsoft says it has a different approach that will make its technology less error-prone and more suitable for commercial use. If it works. On Monday, the company unveiled a new programming language called Q# – pronounced Q Sharp – and tools that help coders craft software for quantum computers. Microsoft is also releasing simulators that will let programmers test that software on a traditional desktop computer or through its Azure cloud-computing service.
The machines are one of the advanced technologies, along with artificial intelligence and augmented reality, that Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella considers crucial to the future of his company. Microsoft, like IBM and Google, will most likely rent computing time on these quantum machines through the internet as a service.D-Wave Systems Inc. in 2011 became the first company to sell a quantum computer, although its technology has been

 

(Bloomberg) — Big technology companies have added the digital signatures of 40,000 terrorist videos and images to a shared database as they seek to keep extremist content off their platforms.
Facebook Inc., Google’s YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet Inc., Microsoft Corp., and Twitter Inc. revealed the numbers in a joint blog post Monday.
The four big social media companies, which are part of a group called the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, announced one year ago that they would begin sharing digital fingerprints – known as hashes – of videos they removed from their platforms for terrorism.
Under the initiative, if a company removes a piece of content from its network for violating policies around terrorism, it is logged in the shared database. Then, if someone tries to post the same content to one of the other participating social networks, the content is automatically flagged for review – usually by a human analyst – and possible removal.
Technology companies have been under increasing pressure from Western politicians to do more to tackle terrorist propaganda and recruitment online. British Prime Minister Theresa May has been particularly active in accusing tech companies of not doing enough to keep extremists off their platforms and has called for international regulation to force the companies to do more or face substantial penalties.
The companies, for their part, have recently been highlighting their progress in using artificial

 

(Bloomberg) — Big technology companies have added the digital signatures of 40,000 terrorist videos and images to a shared database as they seek to keep extremist content off their platforms.
Facebook Inc., Google’s YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet Inc., Microsoft Corp., and Twitter Inc. revealed the numbers in a joint blog post Monday.
The four big social media companies, which are part of a group called the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, announced one year ago that they would begin sharing digital fingerprints – known as hashes – of videos they removed from their platforms for terrorism.
Under the initiative, if a company removes a piece of content from its network for violating policies around terrorism, it is logged in the shared database. Then, if someone tries to post the same content to one of the other participating social networks, the content is automatically flagged for review – usually by a human analyst – and possible removal.
Technology companies have been under increasing pressure from Western politicians to do more to tackle terrorist propaganda and recruitment online. British Prime Minister Theresa May has been particularly active in accusing tech companies of not doing enough to keep extremists off their platforms and has called for international regulation to force the companies to do more or face substantial penalties.
The companies, for their part, have recently been highlighting their progress in using artificial

 

(Bloomberg) — Amazon.com Inc. unveiled new cloud computing services and tools Wednesday aimed at maintaining its edge over Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc. in the fast-growing, profitable market.

Amazon Web Services Chief Executive Officer Andy Jassy announced machine learning capabilities such as speech recognition and translation, intended to make the technology more accessible to developers who don’t have the time or resources to experiment with it on their own.
The presentation showed that Amazon anticipates high demand for machine learning products that can be sold to a variety of industries. Speech and image recognition and real-time language translation were among the tools Jassy unveiled Wednesday at the company’s annual convention in Las Vegas. The gathering is expected to draw 40,000 people for a week of learning about the latest offerings and services.
Amazon introduced SageMaker, which provides popular algorithms for tasks such as parsing data or recognizing images and speech. Amazon also showed off AWS DeepLens, a $249 device to help developers understand and experiment with machine learning. In a demonstration, the camera recognized a smile to be a positive reaction to a music album cover and a frown to be a negative reaction, enabling it to fine tune a customized playlist for the user. Other possible uses are to program a garage door to open when the camera recognizes a license plate number or sending an alert to an owner when their dog jumps on

 

(Bloomberg) — Amazon.com Inc. unveiled new cloud computing services and tools Wednesday aimed at maintaining its edge over Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc. in the fast-growing, profitable market.

Amazon Web Services Chief Executive Officer Andy Jassy announced machine learning capabilities such as speech recognition and translation, intended to make the technology more accessible to developers who don’t have the time or resources to experiment with it on their own.
The presentation showed that Amazon anticipates high demand for machine learning products that can be sold to a variety of industries. Speech and image recognition and real-time language translation were among the tools Jassy unveiled Wednesday at the company’s annual convention in Las Vegas. The gathering is expected to draw 40,000 people for a week of learning about the latest offerings and services.
Amazon introduced SageMaker, which provides popular algorithms for tasks such as parsing data or recognizing images and speech. Amazon also showed off AWS DeepLens, a $249 device to help developers understand and experiment with machine learning. In a demonstration, the camera recognized a smile to be a positive reaction to a music album cover and a frown to be a negative reaction, enabling it to fine tune a customized playlist for the user. Other possible uses are to program a garage door to open when the camera recognizes a license plate number or sending an alert to an owner when their dog jumps on

 

(Bloomberg) — The internet is steadily pulling in more shoppers, advertisers and businesses, helping the largest technology companies including Amazon.com Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc. churn out strong revenue and profit growth for another quarter.
All three beat analysts’ sales and profit estimates in the September quarter, sending their shares higher in late trading Thursday and putting the stocks on course to hit records or come close Friday. Consumers and corporations are moving more of their day-to-day functions and business to the internet, from advertising and shopping to workplace software, data storage and applications hosting. That means increased sales for Amazon’s online marketplace, more eyeballs on ads dished out in Google’s mobile search results, and busier servers in all three companies’ data centers.
Even technology companies on the periphery of this internet boom managed to catch some of the wave. Intel Corp.’s server-chip business has struggled as big companies use their own data centers less and move operations to the cloud. However, the semiconductor company is now selling more to the big internet companies that lead in those services.
There are risks: regulators around the world are considering how to control internet companies’ influence, and in the U.S., Google and Facebook Inc. are facing criticism after their advertising services were misused by Russia-linked groups to influence last year’s presidential election. But

 

(Bloomberg) — The U.S. Justice Department is moving to scale back the use of orders forcing technology companies to turn over customer data without alerting users to the clandestine interception of their information.
Microsoft Corp., which sued the government over the practice last year, and other internet giants have argued that the future of cloud computing is in jeopardy if customers can’t trust that their data will remain private. In response to new guidelines quietly issued last week by the Justice Department aimed at making “sneak-and-peek” searches more selective, Microsoft said Monday it plans to drop its lawsuit, which was backed by rivals including Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Amazon.com Inc.
The rapid growth of the cloud, in which customer data is stored by providers like Microsoft, Apple Inc., Amazon and Google in the technology companies’ own servers, has increased the frequency of warrants seeking information.
Going forward, prosecutors must “conduct an individualized and meaningful assessment” of whether a secrecy order is needed, according to a memo issued by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. For internet users whose data is sought, the government shouldn’t delay notifying them for more than a year, except “barring exceptional circumstances,” according to the memo. Microsoft argued in court that too many data requests carry secrecy provisions, often of indefinite duration, that violate the company’s free-speech

 

(Bloomberg) — Advances in artificial intelligence should be used to help humans and machines work together, rather than to create competition between them in everything from chess matches to the job market, Microsoft Corp. Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella writes in his new book, “Hit Refresh.”
“The first choices we get to make are choices around the design of AI, and let’s make that first design choice to augment human capability,” instead of seeking ways to have technology replace people, Nadella said in an interview Monday, a day ahead of the book’s release. He cited a Microsoft project that uses computer vision to aid blind users as one example. “Our goal should be to find more and more examples of such sort.”
Realizing that ideal is going to take a lot of work, he says. Like U.S. President John F. Kennedy’s commitment to land the U.S. on the moon in the 1960s, the technology industry and its funders need to set a goal for AI that is “sufficiently bold and ambitious, one that goes beyond anything that can be achieved through incremental improvements to current technology,” writes the 50-year-old Nadella. To get there, he calls for greater cooperation on AI among the influential companies in the industry, including Microsoft, the world’s largest software maker and a player in AI research for more than two decades. ”Advancing AI to this level will require an effort even more ambitious than a moon shot,” he writes. Nadella

 

(Bloomberg) — Advances in artificial intelligence should be used to help humans and machines work together, rather than to create competition between them in everything from chess matches to the job market, Microsoft Corp. Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella writes in his new book, “Hit Refresh.”
“The first choices we get to make are choices around the design of AI, and let’s make that first design choice to augment human capability,” instead of seeking ways to have technology replace people, Nadella said in an interview Monday, a day ahead of the book’s release. He cited a Microsoft project that uses computer vision to aid blind users as one example. “Our goal should be to find more and more examples of such sort.”
Realizing that ideal is going to take a lot of work, he says. Like U.S. President John F. Kennedy’s commitment to land the U.S. on the moon in the 1960s, the technology industry and its funders need to set a goal for AI that is “sufficiently bold and ambitious, one that goes beyond anything that can be achieved through incremental improvements to current technology,” writes the 50-year-old Nadella. To get there, he calls for greater cooperation on AI among the influential companies in the industry, including Microsoft, the world’s largest software maker and a player in AI research for more than two decades. ”Advancing AI to this level will require an effort even more ambitious than a moon shot,” he writes. Nadella

 

Iron Networks today announced at the Microsoft Management Summit (MMS) in Las Vegas, the release of the MNV Network Virtualization Gateway appliance.amp;nbsp; The appliance series has been named MNV for Microsoft Corp.\’s Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V Network Virtualization and is built upon Windows Server 2012, and integrates directly with Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V and Microsoft System Center 2012 SP1.

Source: Iron Networks Announces Windows Server 2012 Network Virtualization Gateway Appliance

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