(Bloomberg) — Iron Mountain Inc. agreed to acquire the U.S. operations of Io Data Centers LLC for $1.3 billion, adding to a string of deals this year by the data storage and management real estate investment trust.

Io will receive an additional $60 million based on the future performance of the centers, Iron Mountain said in a statement Monday. Iron Mountain is acquiring land and buildings in New Jersey, Ohio and Arizona that provide 62 megawatts of capacity.
The data center market is “super exciting for us,” William L. Meaney, chief executive officer of Iron Mountain, said in an interview. Large enterprises developing their cloud strategies “really fuels the growth of people like ourselves,” he said.
Iron Mountain agreed in July to buy Mag Datacenters LLC, which operates private data center business Fortrust, for about $130 million. In October, it said it was acquiring data centers in Singapore and London from Credit Suisse Group AG in a $100 million transaction.
“We look at a lot of deals but we’re really disciplined,” Meaney said. With the Io assets “we were able to find both the quality of assets and pricing that made sense,” he said.
The purchase of Phoenix-based Io’s U.S. operations will be Iron Mountain’s second biggest deal by valuation, after its 2015 agreement to acquire Recall Holdings Ltd. for about $2.6 billion.
Iron Mountain’s data center business is expected to contribute about 7 percent of its total revenue by 2020, according to

 

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Green House Data, provider of data center services primarily in tier 2 US data center markets, announced this week that it has acquired Ajubeo, a privately held provider of cloud infrastructure services hosted in data centers in two secondary US markets and two markets in Germany.
Ajubeo’s data centers are in Denver, New Jersey, Frankfurt, and Dusseldorf, but Cheyenne, Wyoming-based Green House only plans to keep the Denver footprint, a company spokesperson told us over email Friday. Green House has had a data center in Denver already, so the deal expands its presence in that market.
The deal exemplifies a trend where smaller data center providers, who generally shy away from top markets like Northern Virginia and Silicon Valley, which are crowded by the biggest players, expand their footprint in secondary markets, where they provide not only data center space and power but also higher level technology services, such as helping enterprises chart and execute a path to a modern cloud infrastructure.
Green House has also been differentiating by purchasing 100 percent renewable energy for its facilities – something that’s becoming increasingly important for corporate data center customers, many of whom have corporate sustainability programs and carbon reduction goals.
While Green House isn’t completely absent from tier 1 US markets – it has a data center in Dallas – most of its footprint is in places like Denver, Portland,

 

Data center operator Net Access will host Ubiquity Hosting’s cloud business services from one of its New Jersey data centers, the company announced Tuesday. Ubiquity is seeking to expand its platform to meet growing demand for its cloud and virtual server solutions.

The post Ubiquity Hosting Taps Net Access for Infrastructure Expansion appeared first on Web Hosting Talk.

 

Internap’s OpenStack public cloud offering AgileCLOUD is now available from the New York metro area, the company announced Tuesday, just three months after AgileCLOUD’s last expansion.

The post Internap Brings OpenStack Public Cloud Offering to New Jersey appeared first on Web Hosting Talk.

 

With its 75 Broad Street facility in Manhattan nearing full capacity, Internap is adding some much needed space in the New York metro market. Internap is opening a hybrid data center in Secaucus, New Jersey, the third company-controlled facility in the New York area and 12th nationwide.

 

Data center professionals are optimists by nature but pessimists by training, which is exactly as it should be when you are in the business of keeping very complicated systems up and running despite a million things that can go wrong. Our goal is to keep these mission-critical facilities fully operational with no downtime, and we arrive at work every day optimistic and determined that we will accomplish that impossible objective. But at the same time, we are forever braced for the worst to happen and always planning contingencies to preempt or mitigate those worst-case scenarios.

To put it simply, we confidently expect sunshine, while feverishly planning for the Storm of the Century, both figuratively and literally. That’s our job in a nutshell, so it’s no wonder we are a quirky bunch with those two mindsets fighting for room inside each of our heads.

Luckily, the truly worst-case scenarios that we think about, create contingency plans for, build redundant systems for and conduct live drills for almost never happen. Until they do. That is when all of our worrying and contingency planning gets put to the test. Hurricane Sandy last year was one of those worst-case scenarios. When it made landfall in New Jersey in October 2012, the winds and record storm surge combined to devastating effect, and the damage was so severe that residents of coastal neighborhoods are still trying to recover.* For the data center industry, the storm had an enormous impact that continues to reverberate many months later. At a recent data center event in New York where I spoke on a panel, Sandy was by far the dominant topic. Officially, the storm was only the focus of one panel session, but unofficially it was everywhere.

A lot of the discussion naturally began with personal stories about the impact of the storm, but it inevitably turned to what worked and what didn’t work when the water started rising and contingency plans designed for hypothetical emergencies were pitted against the reality of a natural disaster. There were a lot of successes to discuss, but there was also a lot of candidness about what did not work. The experience of Sandy gives us the rare opportunity to see our contingency plans put to the test in a living laboratory, and I feel strongly that there should be a healthy industry dialogue about that to help prepare us all for the next worst-case scenario. To help contribute to that dialogue, this column outlines three key lessons that I have learned through dialogues with fellow data center professionals since the flood waters receded.

Is Your Fuel Supply Chain Ready?

One of the biggest lessons from Sandy is something that anyone who has ever seen the movie Mad Max knows quite well: in a crisis, gasoline becomes very scarce very quickly. Data center disaster plans put a big focus on backup generators, and all the engineering and technology in those systems performed very well by all accounts…until the diesel started running out. Generators are not much use without fuel, and the storm revealed that many organizations did not put enough focus on their fuel supply chain.

Gas was in short supply for a lengthy period of time after the storm, which created problems for many facilities. Even organizations that did have access to fuel ran into transportation problems that prevented fuel from being delivered when they needed it. They could procure it; they just couldn’t get their hands on it because delivery routes were shut down. This is an important issue for our industry to address because these same issues are likely to occur with other scenarios such as earthquakes and hurricanes/tornadoes that cause significant damage to civil infrastructure. A key lesson learned from the Sandy fallout is that we as an industry need to devote more attention to fuel on hand, redundancy in the supply chain, supply geography and alternate transportation routes.

What’s in the Fine Print of Your Contracts?

In the aftermath of Sandy, a lot of companies found out the hard way about an often overlooked part of data center contracts: the force majure clause. In common parlance, it is better known as the “act of God” clause, which excuses a data center operator from the terms of a client contract if something beyond their control makes it impossible for them to meet their obligations. Anyone would consider a superstorm that puts lower Manhattan and large portions of Staten Island and New Jersey under water a situation that meets the terms of a force majure clause, but some data center companies learned that their client contracts had weak or nonexistent act of God sections that didn’t protect them properly.

Data center clients, on the other hand, bemoaned the force majure clauses in their contracts when the act of God actually affected their business. No one ever thinks an act of God will occur, so force majure sections are often overlooked as standard contract language. With the experience of Sandy behind us, it is a clause sure to receive more focus from both sides on future data center contract negotiations so that both providers and customers of data center services fully understand this contractual language and feel protected in the case of a natural disaster.

Do You Have a Plan for Your People, Not Just Your Data Center Technology?

Data center contingency plans tend to focus first and foremost on systems and technology, but they often lack enough foresight about the people challenges that occur during a disaster like Sandy. Because of the scope of Sandy’s damage, organizations couldn’t just focus on technology. They also needed to be able to support their employees, who were coping with the impact on their homes and families at the same time they were trying to fulfill their duties at work.

Contingency plans often have a static view of the role personnel will play in responding to an emergency: they are often built with the assumption that personnel will be there when needed and won’t have divided attention, just like it’s a regular day of work. But the reality is that a storm like Sandy leaves employees struggling with personal concerns alongside their work duties. That is a reality that contingency plans must do a better job of anticipating and responding to. There were also many very practical people issues that organizations need to prepare for: The storm trapped people at work for extended periods of time, prevented fresh staff from coming to work, made key people unavailable, forced people to sleep at work, led to difficulties feeding workers on site and much more. Many organizations had to create special contingency plans on the fly just to address the needs of their people, including special arrangements for transportation, food, rest, support for the non-work responsibilities that they were juggling and so on.

Unlike redundant equipment dedicated to the single purpose of protecting the data center with failover capabilities, the human factor is much trickier. Clearly redundancy is required so that no single person is critical to operations, but when regions of homes and people are affected by a disaster, N+1 on the personnel front may not be enough. The value of cross training for a broader set of roles becomes clear when a disaster like Sandy made it difficult for large swaths of employees to get to the data center.

This is by no means a definitive discussion of lessons learned from Sandy, but hopefully it is a helpful addition to the ongoing dialogue about how our industry can prepare for the next situation that requires us to implement the contingency plans we work so hard to develop.

*For more information about how you can continue supporting people affected by Hurricane Sandy, visit the Sandy Relief Fund page (http://sandynjrelieffund.org) and the United Way’s Sandy Response page (https://donate.unitedwaynyc.org/page/contribute/uwsandyrecovery).

Leading article image courtesy of NASA

About the Author

data centerMike Klein is the co-CEO of Online Tech (www.onlinetech.com), which provides secure, mission-critical cloud computing to mid-market companies across the U.S., with a focus on compliance specifically required for health care, financial and retail markets.

The post Preparing for the Next Sandy: Lessons in Data Center Contingency Planning appeared first on The Data Center Journal.

 

(Gawkwire) – Innovative shared hosting operating system (OS) developer CloudLinux (http://www.cloudlinux.com) announced today the active role the company will play at HostingCon 2013. Attendees will be able to unwind in the “CloudLinux Comfort Zone,” hear statistics about how shared hosting companies are working, and even win more than $65,000 worth of software including CloudLinux server licenses.

“HostingCon is a very important event to the CloudLinux team,” says Igor Seletskiy, Founder and CEO at CloudLinux. “The event gives hosting companies, service providers, and innovators a place to get together for learning, networking, and creating new partnerships. With so many opportunities for work, we wanted to give attendees a place to relax and experience the life of a CloudLinux administrator.”

CloudLinux will transform booth #425 into the “CloudLinux Comfort Zone,” a relaxed environment with massage chairs and chocolates. As attendees take a few moments out of their busy days, they will discover how relaxing life can be with the CloudLinux OS. The CloudLinux OS is a unique operating system designed for the requirements of shared hosting providers. With hardware resource limits defined for each user, system administrators using CloudLinux can forget about the “bad neighbor” effect and spend less time worrying about performance and server stability.

“CloudLinux makes life easier for hosts, and we wanted to give visitors to our booth at HostingCon 2013 a taste of that lifestyle,” says Seletskiy. “Of course, HostingCon is also a place for networking and growing your business. The event gives attendees deep insights into the entire web hosting industry, particularly through sessions, talks, and panels. This year, I will be delivering a speech that brings together data from more than a hundred different shared hosting companies to show attendees what their competitors are doing to ensure success.”

In “What Are Your Competitors Doing? Shared Hosting in Numbers,” Igor Seletskiy will present technical data collected from shared hosting providers. The detailed statistics will show how much RAM servers have, which software they are running, the number of cores per server, and much more. While Seletskiy’s session will offer invaluable technical insight, CloudLinux is also taking part in a giveaway that will provide hosts with the software they need to grow. Attendees can enter a contest from email security company SpamExperts to win “The Complete Service Provider Package” made up of $65,000 worth of licenses from major names in the hosting industry. The package includes 100 server licenses from CloudLinux, worth $12,000 alone.

“The Complete Service Provider Package is the biggest giveaway in the history of HostingCon, and CloudLinux is the ideal, high compatibility OS for the included software to be installed on,” says Seletskiy. “I would like to encourage everybody to visit booth #425 for some relaxation, attend my talk for some insider advice, and take part in this incredible contest.”

Since 2009, CloudLinux has developed a reputation for making the life of web hosts easier and more relaxed. HostingCon 2013 is an excellent opportunity to experience the feeling of CloudLinux first-hand.

CloudLinux will be at HostingCon 2013 in booth #425. Igor Seletskiy’s session, “What Are Your Competitors Doing? Shared Hosting in Numbers,” takes place on Wednesday, June 19th at 10:00am.

To learn more about CloudLinux and the CloudLinux OS, visit http://www.cloudlinux.com.

About CloudLinux

CloudLinux was founded in 2009 to address the distinctive needs of web hosting providers. The company’s headquarters are in Princeton, New Jersey, and its development team, composed of employees with an appreciable proficiency in the hosting business, is based in Donetsk, Ukraine. CloudLinux is a stable, privately funded company geared toward providing the ideal operating system (OS) to make even the most intricate and divergent hosting needs more straightforward. The company’s flagship OS is optimized to help hosting providers deliver more stable shared hosting services, with account isolation and resource allocation on an OS level.

http://www.gawkwire.com/web_hosting/cloudlinux_adds_hostingcon_comfort_zone.html

 

(The Hosting News) – Innovative shared hosting operating system (OS) developer CloudLinux (http://www.cloudlinux.com) announced today the active role the company will play at HostingCon 2013. Attendees will be able to unwind in the “CloudLinux Comfort Zone,” hear statistics about how shared hosting companies are working, and even win more than $65,000 worth of software including CloudLinux server licenses.

“HostingCon is a very important event to the CloudLinux team,” says Igor Seletskiy, Founder and CEO at CloudLinux. “The event gives hosting companies, service providers, and innovators a place to get together for learning, networking, and creating new partnerships. With so many opportunities for work, we wanted to give attendees a place to relax and experience the life of a CloudLinux administrator.”

CloudLinux will transform booth #425 into the “CloudLinux Comfort Zone,” a relaxed environment with massage chairs and chocolates. As attendees take a few moments out of their busy days, they will discover how relaxing life can be with the CloudLinux OS. The CloudLinux OS is a unique operating system designed for the requirements of shared hosting providers. With hardware resource limits defined for each user, system administrators using CloudLinux can forget about the “bad neighbor” effect and spend less time worrying about performance and server stability.

“CloudLinux makes life easier for hosts, and we wanted to give visitors to our booth at HostingCon 2013 a taste of that lifestyle,” says Seletskiy. “Of course, HostingCon is also a place for networking and growing your business. The event gives attendees deep insights into the entire web hosting industry, particularly through sessions, talks, and panels. This year, I will be delivering a speech that brings together data from more than a hundred different shared hosting companies to show attendees what their competitors are doing to ensure success.”

In “What Are Your Competitors Doing? Shared Hosting in Numbers,” Igor Seletskiy will present technical data collected from shared hosting providers. The detailed statistics will show how much RAM servers have, which software they are running, the number of cores per server, and much more. While Seletskiy’s session will offer invaluable technical insight, CloudLinux is also taking part in a giveaway that will provide hosts with the software they need to grow. Attendees can enter a contest from email security company SpamExperts to win “The Complete Service Provider Package” made up of $65,000 worth of licenses from major names in the hosting industry. The package includes 100 server licenses from CloudLinux, worth $12,000 alone.

“The Complete Service Provider Package is the biggest giveaway in the history of HostingCon, and CloudLinux is the ideal, high compatibility OS for the included software to be installed on,” says Seletskiy. “I would like to encourage everybody to visit booth #425 for some relaxation, attend my talk for some insider advice, and take part in this incredible contest.”

Since 2009, CloudLinux has developed a reputation for making the life of web hosts easier and more relaxed. HostingCon 2013 is an excellent opportunity to experience the feeling of CloudLinux first-hand.

CloudLinux will be at HostingCon 2013 in booth #425. Igor Seletskiy’s session, “What Are Your Competitors Doing? Shared Hosting in Numbers,” takes place on Wednesday, June 19th at 10:00am.

To learn more about CloudLinux and the CloudLinux OS, visit http://www.cloudlinux.com.

About CloudLinux

CloudLinux was founded in 2009 to address the distinctive needs of web hosting providers. The company’s headquarters are in Princeton, New Jersey, and its development team, composed of employees with an appreciable proficiency in the hosting business, is based in Donetsk, Ukraine. CloudLinux is a stable, privately funded company geared toward providing the ideal operating system (OS) to make even the most intricate and divergent hosting needs more straightforward. The company’s flagship OS is optimized to help hosting providers deliver more stable shared hosting services, with account isolation and resource allocation on an OS level.

Source: CloudLinux Adds Comfort Zone at HostingCon

 

June 7, 2013 — VPS hosting company ChicagoVPS announced on Friday that it has expanded its services to two new locations, Dallas, Texas and Piscataway, New Jersey, and will begin offering VPS hosting services out of the new facilities immediately.

Keep on reading: ChicagoVPS Expands Hosting Services to Texas and New Jersey

 

(The Hosting News) – Good news in the area of identity theft: Tech giant Microsoft announced on Wednesday that it had successfully halted over one thousand botnets negatively affecting consumers.

In addition to identity theft, the botnets were said to steal peoples’ online banking information.

To conduct the operation, the tech giant worked with FBI officials along with other organizations including the Electronic Payments Association and the American Bankers Association.

Microsoft began carrying out the investigation early last year. The botnets themselves relied on Citadel malware.

“The harm done by Citadel shows the threat that botnets, malicious software, and piracy pose to individuals and businesses around the world,” stated Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith via a press release.

He continued, “Today’s coordinated action between the private sector and law enforcement demonstrates the power of combined legal and technical expertise and we’re going to continue to work together to help put these cybercriminals out of business.”

The news follows Microsoft’s filing of a civil suit against the botnets’ operators which allowed the company to “cut off communication between 1,462 Citadel botnets and the millions of infected computers under their control” via a raid on data centers in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Microsoft’s Digital Crimes Unit has conducted similar operations in the past. In March of last year, the company worked with authorities to seize servers responsible for the infamous Zeus botnet.

Source: Microsoft Shuts Down Citadel Malware Botnets

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