(Bloomberg) — Big technology companies have added the digital signatures of 40,000 terrorist videos and images to a shared database as they seek to keep extremist content off their platforms.
Facebook Inc., Google’s YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet Inc., Microsoft Corp., and Twitter Inc. revealed the numbers in a joint blog post Monday.
The four big social media companies, which are part of a group called the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, announced one year ago that they would begin sharing digital fingerprints – known as hashes – of videos they removed from their platforms for terrorism.
Under the initiative, if a company removes a piece of content from its network for violating policies around terrorism, it is logged in the shared database. Then, if someone tries to post the same content to one of the other participating social networks, the content is automatically flagged for review – usually by a human analyst – and possible removal.
Technology companies have been under increasing pressure from Western politicians to do more to tackle terrorist propaganda and recruitment online. British Prime Minister Theresa May has been particularly active in accusing tech companies of not doing enough to keep extremists off their platforms and has called for international regulation to force the companies to do more or face substantial penalties.
The companies, for their part, have recently been highlighting their progress in using artificial

 

(Bloomberg) — Big technology companies have added the digital signatures of 40,000 terrorist videos and images to a shared database as they seek to keep extremist content off their platforms.
Facebook Inc., Google’s YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet Inc., Microsoft Corp., and Twitter Inc. revealed the numbers in a joint blog post Monday.
The four big social media companies, which are part of a group called the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism, announced one year ago that they would begin sharing digital fingerprints – known as hashes – of videos they removed from their platforms for terrorism.
Under the initiative, if a company removes a piece of content from its network for violating policies around terrorism, it is logged in the shared database. Then, if someone tries to post the same content to one of the other participating social networks, the content is automatically flagged for review – usually by a human analyst – and possible removal.
Technology companies have been under increasing pressure from Western politicians to do more to tackle terrorist propaganda and recruitment online. British Prime Minister Theresa May has been particularly active in accusing tech companies of not doing enough to keep extremists off their platforms and has called for international regulation to force the companies to do more or face substantial penalties.
The companies, for their part, have recently been highlighting their progress in using artificial

 

(Bloomberg) — Baidu Inc. is building a system to allow China’s cybercops to spot and fix “online rumors” deemed a threat to stability, allowing police agencies to insert themselves directly into everything from its search results to discussion forums.
The platform links 372 police agencies who will use sophisticated artificial intelligence-driven tools to monitor and respond to fake news, blogposts and other items across about a dozen Baidu services, including the popular search engine, the official Xinhua News Agency reported. More than 600 organizations and experts in different areas will be enlisted to weigh in on their respective fields, according to an email sent by Baidu. They included official organs such as the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, as well as media outfits such as Shanghai United Media Group and Caijing.
See also: Chinese Regulator Starts Probe Into Tencent, Weibo and Baidu
Internet giants from Facebook Inc. to Twitter Inc. are struggling to deal with a proliferation of spurious news articles across social media services. Baidu’s approach allows the Chinese government to intervene directly and write articles in rebuttal. Items that its system decides are fake will be clearly labeled a “rumor” at the very top of search results, alongside an explanation penned by the relevant agency or organization, according to a sample page Baidu provided.
The same system will be employed across products from its news aggregator and online forums to

 

(Bloomberg) — European leaders will warn the world’s biggest technology companies that they face fines unless they meet a target of removing terrorist content from the internet within two hours of it appearing.
At a meeting in New York on the sidelines of the United Nations annual meeting, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emmanuel Macron and Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni will address executives from companies including Facebook Inc., Alphabet Inc.’s Google, Microsoft Corp. and Twitter Inc.
Their goal is to persuade these tech giants that stopping terrorists from using their platforms should be a priority and the focus for innovation. May’s office pointed to Twitter’s success in this area. The company said Tuesday that automated tools had helped it to suspend nearly 300,000 accounts linked to terrorism so far this year.
“Terrorist groups are aware that links to their propaganda are being removed more quickly, and are placing a greater emphasis on disseminating content at speed in order to stay ahead,” May will tell the meeting, according to her office. “Industry needs to go further and faster in automating the detection and removal of terrorist content online, and developing technological solutions which prevent it being uploaded in the first place.”
Most of the material that Islamic State puts online is aimed at radicalizing people and encouraging them to carry out attacks at home. Britain has seen four such attacks this year,

 

(Bloomberg) — Indonesia and  Alphabet Inc.’s Google agreed to step up monitoring of content on YouTube after the government said it was concerned about the growing misuse of social media platforms to spread material related to terrorism, racial violence and pornography.
The world’s fourth-most populous country has begun the trial of a so-called “trusted flagger system” to filter content on the video sharing website and will seek to formalize it in the coming months,  Rudiantara, Communications and Information Technology minister, told reporters in Jakarta on Friday. The flagging system, to be used by the ministry and local non-government groups, will be limited to YouTube and will not apply to Google’s search engine, he said.
U.K.’s Rudd Continues Campaign Against Terrorism Content Online
“We want to ensure content doesn’t promote violence or incites divisions in the country,” Rudiantara, who like many Indonesian uses only one name, said after a meeting with Google executives. Taj Meadows, Google’s head of policy communications for Asia Pacific, declined to comment.
Indonesian officials and executives from Twitter Inc. agreed at a separate meeting on Friday on the need to improve monitoring of content although they didn’t decide on a method. Samuel Abrijani, director general for information applications at Communications Ministry, said the government has proposed a similar system for Twitter as the one agreed with Google.
Terrorism,

 

(Bloomberg) — Home Secretary Amber Rudd will call on Internet companies to do more to tackle extremist content during a visit to silicon valley as the U.K. steps up its drive to clamp down on on-line radicalization.
“Terrorists and extremists have sought to misuse your platforms to spread their hateful messages,” Rudd will tell technology companies including Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google in San Francisco on Tuesday, according to extracts of her speech emailed by her office. “The responsibility for tackling this threat at every level lies with both governments and with industry.”
I Side With the ‘Bad Guys’ on Encryption
After four terror attacks in as many months in the U.K., Rudd made eliminating extremist content from social networks a priority of her tenure as Home Secretary. She met with officials from Facebook, Google, Microsoft Corp. and Twitter Inc. in March, a week after a car-and-knife attack on Westminster Bridge and Parliament, calling on them to tackle the problem “head-on.”
Tuesday’s meeting is the first by a forum of tech companies formed in the wake of the attacks. Its aim is to develop further technical tools to identify and remove terrorist propaganda from websites. Rudd will also hold a series of meetings with “the main communication service providers” in Silicon Valley, her office said.
U.K. Parliament Maintains Restrictions After Email Hack
Rudd met with Facebook Inc’s Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg

© 2012 Webhosting news Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha