(The Hosting News) – Internet Infrastructure Coalition (i2Coalition) Co-Founder and Board Chair Christian Dawson today released the following statement on legislation put forth by Representatives Issa and Chu to address the problems stemming from “patent trolls”:

“i2Coalition applauds Representatives Issa and Chu for their leadership fighting patent troll abuse and improving patent quality.   Patent trolls now account for a majority of all patent litigation in the United States, with litigation costs for small and medium-sized businesses averaging $1.75 million per lawsuit.  These trolls threaten to stifle the Internet infrastructure industry – an industry which generates an estimated $46 billion in annual direct and indirect revenue.  Litigation from patent trolls often drags on for years, costs millions, and impacts innovation that is so important to the viability of our industry.

The legislation put forth today by Representatives Issa and Chu will provide businesses targeted by patent trolls with a quick, cost-effective alternative to litigation.  It would allow businesses to petition the Patent Office to challenge the validity of a troll’s patent by expanding the Covered Business Method (CBM) Program, which in its present state is limited to financial services patents, to include all business method patents.  The more than 60 companies of the i2Coalition support such measures and thank Representatives Issa and Chu for taking the lead in the House on these issues.”

Internet Infrastructure Coalition Issues Statement on Reps. Issa and Chu’s Patent Troll Legislation

 
(The Hosting News) – ThreatMetrix(TM), the fastest-growing provider of integrated cybercrime solutions, today announced several travel and ticketing scams to be aware of so businesses and consumers can avoid falling victim to cyber risks in the summer months. According to a recent Orbitz.com study, 77 percent of consumers are planning summer getaways this year, enticing cybercriminals to make a profit from various travel and ticketing scams.
Most consumers now purchase concert tickets and book travel arrangements, such as airfare and hotel rooms, online rather than visiting a travel agent or ticketing window. A variety of travel websites and apps now enable consumers to make reservations with the click of a button, placing trust in online transactions. This shift to digital trust offers a major opportunity for cybercriminals to target consumers and businesses as they plan summer leisure activities.
“While digital ticketing is much more convenient for today’s consumers, they must take extra precaution when purchasing online due to payment fraud, identity spoofing and malware risks,” said Alisdair Faulkner, chief products officer, ThreatMetrix. “Summer is the time of year for travel, concerts and music festivals, and fraudsters always go where the money is. The last thing you want this summer is to get scammed by a fraudster when planning a family vacation.”
As summer kicks into full gear, today’s savvy cybercriminals are scamming consumers planning summer activities and getaways. These scams
include:
Ticketing scams — Nearly five million people a year purchase concert,
sporting event and theme park tickets that turn out to be fraudulent.
Cybercriminals use ticketing websites and reseller sites such as
Craigslist for high-demand events to oversell tickets for personal
profit at the expense of authentic buyers.
Nonexistent vacation rentals — Consumers must beware of suspicious
sites and emails offering vacation rental deals from third-party
sources. Cybercriminals often set up fraudulent online travel agencies
to con vacation-goers. Once a customer books advance tickets, the
cybercriminal simply takes the money and runs. This is especially risky
as consumers increasingly use vacation home swapping websites, a prime
target for cybercriminals.
Email hacks — There have been several high profile email hacks in the
past year — including Yahoo!, Gmail, AOL and Hotmail — placing
hundreds of thousands of email addresses in jeopardy. Given today’s
shift to online purchasing, most tickets and travel confirmations are
sent via email. A hacked email can enable cybercriminals to print and
resell concert and other event tickets.
In addition to these risks facing consumers, ticketing, travel and accommodation sites face their own challenges with the growing use of stolen credit cards. This year, U.S. consumers will spend $84 billion on hotel stays alone — most of which will be booked online and need to be screened for fake purchases. To protect against such risks, businesses associated with summer travel and tourism must put preventative measures in place to protect themselves and consumers.
Such measures include extensive credit card screening for suspicious transactions and leveraging the data of a collective network to detect legitimate customers and criminal digital identities , such as the ThreatMetrix Global Trust Intelligence Network (The Network). The Network analyzes more than 350 million monthly transactions for account takeover, payment fraud and identity spoofing attempts without inconveniencing authentic users.
“By leveraging the data of a collective network, online ticketing sites and travel agencies can assure their customers have fun in the sun without getting scammed by cybercriminals,” said Faulkner. “Once sophisticated cybercriminals figure out a way to compromise one travel or tourism business, they can easily target more players in the market.
This collective threat requires a collective response such as a real-time threat intelligence network.”
About ThreatMetrix
ThreatMetrix is the fastest-growing provider of integrated cybercrime prevention solutions. The TrustDefender(TM) Cybercrime Protection Platform helps companies prevent unauthorized access to web and mobile applications, protect sensitive data, and secure transactions against account takeover, payment fraud, identity spoofing, malware, and data breaches. ThreatMetrix protects more than 1,500 customers and 9,000 websites across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government, and insurance. For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.
To join in the cybersecurity conversation, follow us on Twitter @ThreatMetrix.
(C) 2013 ThreatMetrix. All rights reserved. ThreatMetrix, TrustDefender ID, TrustDefender Cloud, TrustDefender Mobile, TrustDefender Client, the TrustDefender Cybercrime Protection Platform, ThreatMetrix Labs, and the ThreatMetrix logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of ThreatMetrix in the United States and other countries. All other brand, service or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies or owners.

ThreatMetrix Cites Cybercrime Scams to be Aware of as Summer Heats Up

 

(The Hosting News) – Internet Infrastructure Coalition (i2Coalition) Co-Founder and Board Chair Christian Dawson today released the following statement on legislation put forth by Representatives Issa and Chu to address the problems stemming from “patent trolls”:

“i2Coalition applauds Representatives Issa and Chu for their leadership fighting patent troll abuse and improving patent quality.   Patent trolls now account for a majority of all patent litigation in the United States, with litigation costs for small and medium-sized businesses averaging $1.75 million per lawsuit.  These trolls threaten to stifle the Internet infrastructure industry – an industry which generates an estimated $46 billion in annual direct and indirect revenue.  Litigation from patent trolls often drags on for years, costs millions, and impacts innovation that is so important to the viability of our industry.

The legislation put forth today by Representatives Issa and Chu will provide businesses targeted by patent trolls with a quick, cost-effective alternative to litigation.  It would allow businesses to petition the Patent Office to challenge the validity of a troll’s patent by expanding the Covered Business Method (CBM) Program, which in its present state is limited to financial services patents, to include all business method patents.  The more than 60 companies of the i2Coalition support such measures and thank Representatives Issa and Chu for taking the lead in the House on these issues.”

Source: Internet Infrastructure Coalition Issues Statement on Reps. Issa and Chu’s Patent Troll Legislation

 
(The Hosting News) – ThreatMetrix(TM), the fastest-growing provider of integrated cybercrime solutions, today announced several travel and ticketing scams to be aware of so businesses and consumers can avoid falling victim to cyber risks in the summer months. According to a recent Orbitz.com study, 77 percent of consumers are planning summer getaways this year, enticing cybercriminals to make a profit from various travel and ticketing scams.
Most consumers now purchase concert tickets and book travel arrangements, such as airfare and hotel rooms, online rather than visiting a travel agent or ticketing window. A variety of travel websites and apps now enable consumers to make reservations with the click of a button, placing trust in online transactions. This shift to digital trust offers a major opportunity for cybercriminals to target consumers and businesses as they plan summer leisure activities.
“While digital ticketing is much more convenient for today’s consumers, they must take extra precaution when purchasing online due to payment fraud, identity spoofing and malware risks,” said Alisdair Faulkner, chief products officer, ThreatMetrix. “Summer is the time of year for travel, concerts and music festivals, and fraudsters always go where the money is. The last thing you want this summer is to get scammed by a fraudster when planning a family vacation.”
As summer kicks into full gear, today’s savvy cybercriminals are scamming consumers planning summer activities and getaways. These scams
include:
Ticketing scams — Nearly five million people a year purchase concert,
sporting event and theme park tickets that turn out to be fraudulent.
Cybercriminals use ticketing websites and reseller sites such as
Craigslist for high-demand events to oversell tickets for personal
profit at the expense of authentic buyers.
Nonexistent vacation rentals — Consumers must beware of suspicious
sites and emails offering vacation rental deals from third-party
sources. Cybercriminals often set up fraudulent online travel agencies
to con vacation-goers. Once a customer books advance tickets, the
cybercriminal simply takes the money and runs. This is especially risky
as consumers increasingly use vacation home swapping websites, a prime
target for cybercriminals.
Email hacks — There have been several high profile email hacks in the
past year — including Yahoo!, Gmail, AOL and Hotmail — placing
hundreds of thousands of email addresses in jeopardy. Given today’s
shift to online purchasing, most tickets and travel confirmations are
sent via email. A hacked email can enable cybercriminals to print and
resell concert and other event tickets.
In addition to these risks facing consumers, ticketing, travel and accommodation sites face their own challenges with the growing use of stolen credit cards. This year, U.S. consumers will spend $84 billion on hotel stays alone — most of which will be booked online and need to be screened for fake purchases. To protect against such risks, businesses associated with summer travel and tourism must put preventative measures in place to protect themselves and consumers.
Such measures include extensive credit card screening for suspicious transactions and leveraging the data of a collective network to detect legitimate customers and criminal digital identities , such as the ThreatMetrix Global Trust Intelligence Network (The Network). The Network analyzes more than 350 million monthly transactions for account takeover, payment fraud and identity spoofing attempts without inconveniencing authentic users.
“By leveraging the data of a collective network, online ticketing sites and travel agencies can assure their customers have fun in the sun without getting scammed by cybercriminals,” said Faulkner. “Once sophisticated cybercriminals figure out a way to compromise one travel or tourism business, they can easily target more players in the market.
This collective threat requires a collective response such as a real-time threat intelligence network.”
About ThreatMetrix
ThreatMetrix is the fastest-growing provider of integrated cybercrime prevention solutions. The TrustDefender(TM) Cybercrime Protection Platform helps companies prevent unauthorized access to web and mobile applications, protect sensitive data, and secure transactions against account takeover, payment fraud, identity spoofing, malware, and data breaches. ThreatMetrix protects more than 1,500 customers and 9,000 websites across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government, and insurance. For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.
To join in the cybersecurity conversation, follow us on Twitter @ThreatMetrix.
(C) 2013 ThreatMetrix. All rights reserved. ThreatMetrix, TrustDefender ID, TrustDefender Cloud, TrustDefender Mobile, TrustDefender Client, the TrustDefender Cybercrime Protection Platform, ThreatMetrix Labs, and the ThreatMetrix logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of ThreatMetrix in the United States and other countries. All other brand, service or product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies or owners.

Source: ThreatMetrix Cites Cybercrime Scams to be Aware of as Summer Heats Up

 

(The Hosting News) – The trend in the industry today is cloud computing. Individuals, businesses, and entire industries are looking toward cloud solutions for the potential cost-saving and efficiency-boosting benefits they promise to provide. But there is one downside to the cloud that people seldom hear about, one thing that must be sacrificed to join the cloud revolution: privacy.

First, here is a little background on what exactly “the cloud” is: When you hear of the cloud, it’s generally referring to a business model where individuals and companies sign up for computing related service with a third party, who then carries out those services at an off-site location. One cloud service model that most everyone is familiar with is email, hosted through companies like Google and Yahoo. You sign up with a company, register an email address, and then you’re given access to the emails sent to that email address. It’s a simple concept that applies to many other cloud services, including off-site data storage and web hosting.

The allure of cloud services is strong: management is taken care of by the company you signed up with, and the emails or data are processed and stored somewhere within the service provider’s server banks. It’s a tempting solution because everything is taken care of by the third party, and you don’t have to worry about it. But, it all comes with a privacy cost too large to ignore.

Any information sent to the cloud becomes immediately accessible to the service provider. Data sent for off-site storage and backup purposes can be accessed by the service provider and its employees. An individual’s emails, which most people assume are private, technically belong to the service provider in almost all cases, and not to holder of the email account. By holding or transferring your data to the cloud, you’re signing it away to a third party when you agree to the terms of service. Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple, pointed this out, saying: “With the cloud, you don’t own anything. You already signed it away.” Your data, for all intents and purposes, belongs to a third party and they can do what they please with it.

This issue of privacy and signing away the rights to your data extends to all aspects of the cloud. Any information that is sent to the service provider is no longer secure. The recent controversies in the United States regarding the privacy of personal information makes these concerns all the more troubling, and makes the need for keeping data secure all the more important. It has been shown that the idea that companies are accessing, reading, and sharing our data without any concern for our privacy isn’t just something that could happen, but is something that really is happening.

Luckily, there is a simple, privacy-friendly alternative to the cloud with Advatronix® Systems.
By utilizing the Cirrus™ 1200 server by Advatronix® Systems, you can pilot your own cloud and keep your data secure, freeing you from the need to rely on the assurances of third parties who have already demonstrated that your privacy is of little concern to them. The Cirrus™ 1200 can function as your own private email server, so your data truly belongs to you, and can eliminate the need for other common cloud services by storing backups, serving as a data repository, or working as a web or file server. With the Cirrus™ 1200, you don’t need to rely on untrustworthy third parties to keep your data safe. The server, and the data inside, belongs to you, and that’s the only way to truly be sure your data is being kept private.

For more information about the Cirrus™ 1200 server by Advatronix® Systems, please visit http://www.advatronix.com/products/CU1200

Maintaining Privacy in the Era of Cloud Computing

 

(The Hosting News) – The trend in the industry today is cloud computing. Individuals, businesses, and entire industries are looking toward cloud solutions for the potential cost-saving and efficiency-boosting benefits they promise to provide. But there is one downside to the cloud that people seldom hear about, one thing that must be sacrificed to join the cloud revolution: privacy.

First, here is a little background on what exactly “the cloud” is: When you hear of the cloud, it’s generally referring to a business model where individuals and companies sign up for computing related service with a third party, who then carries out those services at an off-site location. One cloud service model that most everyone is familiar with is email, hosted through companies like Google and Yahoo. You sign up with a company, register an email address, and then you’re given access to the emails sent to that email address. It’s a simple concept that applies to many other cloud services, including off-site data storage and web hosting.

The allure of cloud services is strong: management is taken care of by the company you signed up with, and the emails or data are processed and stored somewhere within the service provider’s server banks. It’s a tempting solution because everything is taken care of by the third party, and you don’t have to worry about it. But, it all comes with a privacy cost too large to ignore.

Any information sent to the cloud becomes immediately accessible to the service provider. Data sent for off-site storage and backup purposes can be accessed by the service provider and its employees. An individual’s emails, which most people assume are private, technically belong to the service provider in almost all cases, and not to holder of the email account. By holding or transferring your data to the cloud, you’re signing it away to a third party when you agree to the terms of service. Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple, pointed this out, saying: “With the cloud, you don’t own anything. You already signed it away.” Your data, for all intents and purposes, belongs to a third party and they can do what they please with it.

This issue of privacy and signing away the rights to your data extends to all aspects of the cloud. Any information that is sent to the service provider is no longer secure. The recent controversies in the United States regarding the privacy of personal information makes these concerns all the more troubling, and makes the need for keeping data secure all the more important. It has been shown that the idea that companies are accessing, reading, and sharing our data without any concern for our privacy isn’t just something that could happen, but is something that really is happening.

Luckily, there is a simple, privacy-friendly alternative to the cloud with Advatronix® Systems.
By utilizing the Cirrus™ 1200 server by Advatronix® Systems, you can pilot your own cloud and keep your data secure, freeing you from the need to rely on the assurances of third parties who have already demonstrated that your privacy is of little concern to them. The Cirrus™ 1200 can function as your own private email server, so your data truly belongs to you, and can eliminate the need for other common cloud services by storing backups, serving as a data repository, or working as a web or file server. With the Cirrus™ 1200, you don’t need to rely on untrustworthy third parties to keep your data safe. The server, and the data inside, belongs to you, and that’s the only way to truly be sure your data is being kept private.

For more information about the Cirrus™ 1200 server by Advatronix® Systems, please visit http://www.advatronix.com/products/CU1200

Source: Maintaining Privacy in the Era of Cloud Computing

 

(The Hosting News) – Facebook’s Luleå, Sweden data center is now up and running. The social network provider announced the move Wednesday, noting via a blog post that the facility was “now handling live traffic from around the world.”

The Luleå data center features a distinct location: The edge of the Arctic circle (Talk about server cooling!). The location makes use of “chilly Nordic air.”

Facebok based the location’s design on the Open Compute Project – an organization developed by the company with the idea of spreading more efficient blueprints in an open source manner.

“As our systems come online for the first time, we are proud to say that this is likely to be one of the most efficient and sustainable data centers in the world. All the equipment inside is powered by locally generated hydro-electric energy. Not only is it 100% renewable, but the supply is also so reliable that we have been able to reduce the number of backup generators required at the site by more than 70 percent,” stated the company.

The data center is used to provide for Facebook photos, comments, videos, likes, etc.

The Luleå facility represents the social network’s first venture outside the United States. Facebook maintains other locations in Oregon and North Carolina to handle its traffic.

Facebook Gets Chilly; Arctic Data Center Launched

 

(The Hosting News) – Google has a vision for the world’s internet café’s: Less desktops and more tablets.

The company recently moved to replace the traditional computing format at locations in Senegal, West Africa by announcing “TabletCafes.”

“Easy to use tablets are a great way of introducing new users to the Internet. But for most Africans, the hardware remains too expensive.  We’ve come up with a potential solution, making them available in cybercafés,” explained the company via its Europe blog on Thursday.

In fact, the availability of tablets at such locations allows users to install apps along with browsing the internet as they please. Once done, the cafes initiate factory resets on the devices.

“Our hope is that cybercafés attract new customers interested in a more simple and interactive way of going online, and make significant savings on their number one operating expense: electricity. Tablets consume much less power than desktops or laptops, and don’t require ventilation. Among other things, these savings can be reinvested in faster connectivity,” Google went on to say.

Internet cafes aren’t as big in the United States but are extremely helpful in the developing world. According to data from Internet World Stats from Q2 of last year, just 7.0% of Africans are active internet users.

Google Replaces Desktops with Tablets in Senegal

 

(The Hosting News) – Google has a vision for the world’s internet café’s: Less desktops and more tablets.

The company recently moved to replace the traditional computing format at locations in Senegal, West Africa by announcing “TabletCafes.”

“Easy to use tablets are a great way of introducing new users to the Internet. But for most Africans, the hardware remains too expensive.  We’ve come up with a potential solution, making them available in cybercafés,” explained the company via its Europe blog on Thursday.

In fact, the availability of tablets at such locations allows users to install apps along with browsing the internet as they please. Once done, the cafes initiate factory resets on the devices.

“Our hope is that cybercafés attract new customers interested in a more simple and interactive way of going online, and make significant savings on their number one operating expense: electricity. Tablets consume much less power than desktops or laptops, and don’t require ventilation. Among other things, these savings can be reinvested in faster connectivity,” Google went on to say.

Internet cafes aren’t as big in the United States but are extremely helpful in the developing world. According to data from Internet World Stats from Q2 of last year, just 7.0% of Africans are active internet users.

Source: Google Replaces Desktops with Tablets in Senegal

 

Global data center services provider CyrusOne announced today the purchase of an adjacent 32-acre parcel of land at its Houston West campus, which increases the size of the campus to more than 45 acres. With this land acquisition, CyrusOne expands the largest multi-tenant digital energy campus for the oil and gas industry in the United States.

Source: Global Data Center Services Provider CyrusOne Continues To Expand Largest Digital Energy Campus For Oil And Gas Industry In The U.S.

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